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Helpful ReplyMy 2019 718 Cayman GTS PDK

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Brian_Innes
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Re: My 2019 718 Cayman GTS PDK 2019/04/01 17:11:43 (permalink)
On the A835 Wester Ross
 
 

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Nairnshire,
Highlands
Previous:
2007 Cayman 987.1 2.7 Manual.
2010 Cayman S 987.2 Manual
2012 Cayman R Manual
2015 Abarth 595 Competizione 180
2016 718 Cayman S PDK
2019 718 Cayman GTS PDK
Current:
Gen 2 Macan Turbo

JMR
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Re: My 2019 718 Cayman GTS PDK 2019/04/01 20:54:02 (permalink)
Lovely pics Brian.
 
Not jealous...honest 

James
Porsche Boxster 987.1 | 2.7 Manual | Meteor Grey | 19" Carrera S Alloys | Full OPC History
IainCameron
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Re: My 2019 718 Cayman GTS PDK 2019/04/03 08:55:53 (permalink) ☄ Helpfulby Andrew718 2019/04/04 23:55:05
Brian,
I have enjoyed reading your diary of your new Cayman GTS. 
I too bought a new, but standard Boxster 20lt, last September. Like you I am amazed at the mountain of torque that this engine produces even in 2 ltr form. I was lucky enough to test drive all three models of the Boxster, 2ltr, 2.5ltr S and 2.5 GTS. In my summing up of the three of them the GTS was way out in front in the terms of its handling on the track and what made it stand out for me was not the additional power/torque the bigger engines had but the addition of ceramic brakes on the GTS. It was much better around the bends giving good feedback and confidence through the steering-wheel as it turned in. For me, there was not much, if any, difference notable on the track between the base model and the S on standard brakes. I decided that the base model was more than adequate for my needs and giving 40bhp more than my 2.7ltr 981 Boxster bringing a huge smile on my face every time I use this torquey engine.
 
A few observations from your diary concur with my experiences so far.
Like you, I have the GTS front end fitted on my car with the very open air intakes. I was, and am, worried that a large stone will go into the cooling radiators and I have fitted the ZunSport grills without hesitation. They are very well made but, unlike you, I managed to fit my side grills with easy.
Some people have written about Porsche warranties etc if grills are installed. I can tell you that at Porsche Centre Aberdeen they extended the warranty of my previous 981 with Zunsport grills attached when they performed the 110 detailed inspection of the car so they don't have a problem with them being installed during inspection. There was no suggestion that they were to be removed. The car was sold in the Porsche Centre with the grills fitted and the new owner also got a 2 years warranty with the car. My personal view is that Porsche AG and some of it's franchisees go for the easy answer rather than get into all sorts of wrangling over claims for engine damage due to overheating. AND why would the cooling systems overheat with these free flow grills installed. As said before, 911 GT2 and GT3 models have factory installed grills. Where is the logic in that?
 
On the topic of radiators I can tell you that in the 718's the outer radiators are only used for the air conditioning system now. There are no engine coolant radiators there. On most 718's now all the engine cooling radiators are installed in the engine bay. I am surprised by that as the turbo sits in there too. As you already know the GTS has a front central engine coolant radiator. The thing that I find strange is that my "standard" 2ltr car also has a front central radiator installed just like your GTS. I cannot find out why my particular car has this feature as I have looked at the whole range of 718's in showroom's and while out and it is only the GTS that has this middle radiator at the front. Maybe my car's front central radiator does not function but installed in the car to fit nicely with the GTS front end.
 
My engine suffered a very premature Engine coolant reservoir seam weld leak at 500 miles. The previous 981's reservoir is accessible from within the rear boot. Not so with the 718. It can only be removed via the engine bay and that means a full engine out job to gain access to it. The good news was I got to see my engine/gearbox assembly out of the car. (Photo attached, if I can work out how to do it). The good news is that in the 718 the whole engine gearbox and drive-train is designed to drop out as one full assembly so there was no need to disconnect drive shafts, suspension and exhaust system. I believe there are approximately 300 718's affected by this tank defect. Some 718's just leak a very small amount of fluid while running and this can be tolerated by topping up often and some, like mine, blow out thus rendering the car unusable. There is now a recall for these defective tanks to be replaced.
 
Like you I have had my front and side sills wrapped by Callum at Spotless Detailing along with using Gtechniq products on the whole car. My previous 981 was also wrapped and treated in the same way and I am very pleased with the results with the previous car after 3.5 years of use, including trips to south of Spain and Austria. It still looks the same today as I am in regular touch with the new owner of the car. The Gtechiq product for the soft top is particularly impressive and was still offering beading of water after 3 years. 
 
Thanks again for sharing with everyone in the Porsche club your thoughts and Diary of your Cayman GTS. 
I hope to catch up with again this year.
 
 
 

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Iain Cameron:
Boxster 718 PDK, MY18, GT Silver, Carrera Classic 20" Wheels.
..............................................., Arctic Silver..............
2010 Boxster 987 2.9, Arctic Silver............
2015 Boxster 981 2.7, Agite Grey
(329 > max. 255)
Twinfan
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Re: My 2019 718 Cayman GTS PDK 2019/04/03 11:48:59 (permalink)
IainCameron
Some people have written about Porsche warranties etc if grills are installed. I can tell you that at Porsche Centre Aberdeen they extended the warranty of my previous 981 with Zunsport grills attached when they performed the 110 detailed inspection of the car so they don't have a problem with them being installed during inspection. There was no suggestion that they were to be removed. The car was sold in the Porsche Centre with the grills fitted and the new owner also got a 2 years warranty with the car. My personal view is that Porsche AG and some of it's franchisees go for the easy answer rather than get into all sorts of wrangling over claims for engine damage due to overheating. AND why would the cooling systems overheat with these free flow grills installed. As said before, 911 GT2 and GT3 models have factory installed grills. Where is the logic in that?

 
In other threads, the use of Zunsport grilles have been discussed with Porsche AG and their answers were:
 
1.  The grilles restrict airflow and could potentially cause overheating.
2.  GT models have mesh fitted at the factory but they also have larger openings to counter the reduced airflow, thus negating the risk of overheating.
 
Some OPCs will allow you pass the 111-check with them fitted, others will require you remove and re-fit them, but you are risking having a claim rejected if you have engine issues.  Use of the grilles will be apparent due to the existence of marks where the clips were fitted to the bumper inserts, even if you manage to remove them before the broken car is taken to an OPC.
 
My 981 GTS has them fitted and I will not be taking out the extended warranty as my view is that you either play by Porsche AG's rules or you don't play at all.
 
Motorhead
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Re: My 2019 718 Cayman GTS PDK 2019/04/03 13:21:15 (permalink)
IainCameron
 
On the topic of radiators I can tell you that in the 718's the outer radiators are only used for the air conditioning system now. There are no engine coolant radiators there. On most 718's now all the engine cooling radiators are installed in the engine bay.



I don't know where you obtained that information Ian but I'm sure the 718's coolant radiators are still located at the front of the car, behind the a/c condensers. Brian has also mentioned that his PDK GTS has a central coolant radiator (below the number plate), although I'm not sure that it's fitted for all 718 variants. As far as I know, the only 'radiator' in the engine bay is the [air-to-coolant] intercooler.
 
Jeff

987.2 Cayman S
North Beds (R10 & R24)
Brian_Innes
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Re: My 2019 718 Cayman GTS PDK 2019/04/03 13:52:12 (permalink)
Iain,
 
Thank you for your interesting post and comments on your experiences with your new 718 Boxster 2.0t.
 
I was aware of your misfortune with the coolant reservoir leak from your piece in Porsche Post recently. The photo of your complete engine and transmission unit sitting on a trolley in order to gain access to the faulty coolant tank makes for a dramatic photo. It is reassuring to read that all affected 718's are to be recalled for the tank to be replaced. It is also evident from the photo that your 718 2.0 exhaust system is the Gasoline Particulate Filter (GPF) modification, as the smaller mufflers on your Porsche Sports Exhaust confirm.
 
Regarding the Zunsport grills, I have also fitted the central radiator grill and the two lower outer grills. It was the central radiator that was taking all the stone hits and for that reason it was my priority. I have currently left the larger outer condenser intakes standard. Two reasons for this. Firstly, I had great difficulty due to my right hand disability, with fitting the outer grills and flexing the grill without damaging the paintwork. I therefore decided to leave these outer grills off the car meantime and keep an eye on any future stone impacts. As you say, the outer air intakes are for the condensers, not cooling radiators. They contain no engine coolant which could be lost if punctured which was my main worry. Since fitting the three Zunsport grills, that is the central and two lower "letter box" grills, I have covered over 2000 miles and no stone impacts of any significance have been evident so far. One advantage of having the outer air intakes exposed is it makes removing the accumulation of pine needles from the apertures very easy. Regarding the warranty issues of the grills, I have also noted that Aberdeen OPC are very relaxed about this. I have also spoken with OPC Chester and they also take a similar view.
 
I accept David's (Twinfan) point about the possible rejection of any subsequent engine problems under manufacturer's warranty. I've decided to take the risk and fit three of the grills, on the basis that should a stone impact puncture the central radiator resulting in a loss of coolant, I would suffer a double whammy.
1. Replacement radiator parts and labour costs are not covered by the warranty.
2. I have the possibility of my car being stranded in a remote road somewhere with no mobile phone reception.
 
Good to have your contribution Iain, and glad to hear you are enjoying your 718 2.0 Boxster.
 
Brian 
 
                                        

Nairnshire,
Highlands
Previous:
2007 Cayman 987.1 2.7 Manual.
2010 Cayman S 987.2 Manual
2012 Cayman R Manual
2015 Abarth 595 Competizione 180
2016 718 Cayman S PDK
2019 718 Cayman GTS PDK
Current:
Gen 2 Macan Turbo

IainCameron
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Re: My 2019 718 Cayman GTS PDK 2019/04/04 19:55:00 (permalink)
Motorhead
IainCameron
 
On the topic of radiators I can tell you that in the 718's the outer radiators are only used for the air conditioning system now. There are no engine coolant radiators there. On most 718's now all the engine cooling radiators are installed in the engine bay.



I don't know where you obtained that information Ian but I'm sure the 718's coolant radiators are still located at the front of the car, behind the a/c condensers. Brian has also mentioned that his PDK GTS has a central coolant radiator (below the number plate), although I'm not sure that it's fitted for all 718 variants. As far as I know, the only 'radiator' in the engine bay is the [air-to-coolant] intercooler.
 
Jeff


 
Hi Jeff. So, what are these cooling fans radiators for in the engine bay? In fact, there are four radiators sitting above and around the engine? I was told by the technician who was working on the car that these were coolant radiators and that's what they look like to me. I was astonished.
Regards.

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Iain Cameron:
Boxster 718 PDK, MY18, GT Silver, Carrera Classic 20" Wheels.
..............................................., Arctic Silver..............
2010 Boxster 987 2.9, Arctic Silver............
2015 Boxster 981 2.7, Agite Grey
(329 > max. 255)
Ray
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Re: My 2019 718 Cayman GTS PDK 2019/04/04 20:45:19 (permalink)

Ray
Brian_Innes
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Re: My 2019 718 Cayman GTS PDK 2019/04/05 14:28:09 (permalink)

 
Hi Jeff. So, what are these cooling fans radiators for in the engine bay? In fact, there are four radiators sitting above and around the engine? I was told by the technician who was working on the car that these were coolant radiators and that's what they look like to me. I was astonished.
Regards.




Iain,
 
I would have been very interested to inspect your engine unit out of the car and on the workshop trolly.
 
I would guess the coolant radiators that you observed in the engine bay are for the complex charge intercooler arrangement on the 718. On the 718 the intercooler is water cooled, unlike most charge coolers which are air cooled. Because of heat soak issues after switching off the engine, a cooling fan on the driver's side air intake will kick-in for around 2 - 3 minutes to extract the residue heat from the engine bay. Way back in 1989 I owned a Renault 5 GT Turbo which had a similar post switching-off engine bay cooling fan. 
 
Without seeing your engine out of the car for myself, I cannot be sure of the purpose of the all of the 4 radiators you mention, but I would guess at least two of them are charge cooler related.
 
Brian            

Nairnshire,
Highlands
Previous:
2007 Cayman 987.1 2.7 Manual.
2010 Cayman S 987.2 Manual
2012 Cayman R Manual
2015 Abarth 595 Competizione 180
2016 718 Cayman S PDK
2019 718 Cayman GTS PDK
Current:
Gen 2 Macan Turbo

IainCameron
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Re: My 2019 718 Cayman GTS PDK 2019/04/05 20:10:49 (permalink)
=======================================================
Iain,
 
I would have been very interested to inspect your engine unit out of the car and on the workshop trolly.
 
I would guess the coolant radiators that you observed in the engine bay are for the complex charge intercooler arrangement on the 718. On the 718 the intercooler is water cooled, unlike most charge coolers which are air cooled. Because of heat soak issues after switching off the engine, a cooling fan on the driver's side air intake will kick-in for around 2 - 3 minutes to extract the residue heat from the engine bay. Way back in 1989 I owned a Renault 5 GT Turbo which had a similar post switching-off engine bay cooling fan. 
 
Without seeing your engine out of the car for myself, I cannot be sure of the purpose of the all of the 4 radiators you mention, but I would guess at least two of them are charge cooler related.
 Brian            
==============================================

Hello Brian. I understand about the Turbo air inter-cooler. I was with the technician who worked my car and he told me these cooling radiators, as shown in a previous thread above, were the engine coolant radiators so I have to believe him. Here is a link to my Flickr Album for the whole breakdown history. There are quite a few photos of the engine from different views near the bottom of the album. You are more than welcome to take a look. I also link a short YouTube video that shows the engine through a 360 motion. However, you will not see much more of the coolant radiators as they are still bolted onto the top of the engine housing within the car.
https://www.flickr.com/photos/igcameron/albums/72157672327554947
 
https://youtu.be/uyJu5c20E08
 
 
post edited by IainCameron - 2019/04/05 20:12:23

Iain Cameron:
Boxster 718 PDK, MY18, GT Silver, Carrera Classic 20" Wheels.
..............................................., Arctic Silver..............
2010 Boxster 987 2.9, Arctic Silver............
2015 Boxster 981 2.7, Agite Grey
(329 > max. 255)
Motorhead
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Re: My 2019 718 Cayman GTS PDK 2019/04/05 22:36:10 (permalink)
Ian,
 
I think you’ll find that the radiators to which you’re referring are part of the charge-air cooling circuit. Heated coolant from the charge-air cooler on top of the engine (shown in your pics) is transferred to these radiators and is then reused in the engine coolant circuit.
 
The easiest way to confirm that the main engine coolant radiators are located at the front of the car is to stick your hand into a front wheel arch when the engine’s hot and the fans are running..!
 
Disappointing to learn that the whole power-train has to be removed to replace something which would normally be considered a service item. A very expensive job, thankfully carried out under warranty.
 
Jeff

987.2 Cayman S
North Beds (R10 & R24)
PHB1969
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Re: My 2019 718 Cayman GTS PDK 2019/04/06 06:38:27 (permalink)
In terms of the recall, which vehicles are affected?
IainCameron
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Re: My 2019 718 Cayman GTS PDK 2019/04/06 09:07:18 (permalink) ☄ Helpfulby PHB1969 2019/04/06 20:39:47
PHB1969
In terms of the recall, which vehicles are affected?


Hi PHB1969,
I was told that it affected any Cayman and Boxster 718 cars built between March and September 2018. I cannot give you chassis numbers. You would have to ask your friendly Porsche Service Mechanic.

Iain Cameron:
Boxster 718 PDK, MY18, GT Silver, Carrera Classic 20" Wheels.
..............................................., Arctic Silver..............
2010 Boxster 987 2.9, Arctic Silver............
2015 Boxster 981 2.7, Agite Grey
(329 > max. 255)
Philthechip
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Re: My 2019 718 Cayman GTS PDK 2019/04/06 09:15:40 (permalink)
Looks like those front engine mounts left in the car are dynamic too? I heard this is another difference from the 981 where only the 2 rear mounts are dynamic where these are fitted (GTS)
Brian_Innes
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Re: My 2019 718 Cayman GTS PDK 2019/04/06 12:36:00 (permalink)
Phil,
 
You are indeed correct about the dynamic engine mounts. The 718 with Sport Chrono package has 4 dynamic engine and transmission mounts. This feature becomes especially noticeable on track days during feisty cornering. The extra road feel transmitted through the chassis provides the driver with enhanced driving enjoyment. It's a significant improvement over the 981. Even if only for those of us who enjoy track day participation. The 718 is more than a 981 facelift. 
 
Brian
 
Iain,
 
A very interesting sequence of photos. Your heart must have sank when you saw that message on the console. Thank goodness this all happened under warranty. My 718 GTS was built in mid-November, so it seems I just escaped this nightmare.
 
Brian  
post edited by BJ Innes - 2019/04/06 14:55:15

Nairnshire,
Highlands
Previous:
2007 Cayman 987.1 2.7 Manual.
2010 Cayman S 987.2 Manual
2012 Cayman R Manual
2015 Abarth 595 Competizione 180
2016 718 Cayman S PDK
2019 718 Cayman GTS PDK
Current:
Gen 2 Macan Turbo

Brian_Innes
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Re: My 2019 718 Cayman GTS PDK 2019/04/11 16:52:23 (permalink)
Those who followed my previous 718 CS thread will recall my visit last September to the Porsche tuning company FVD Brombacher, based in Freiburg, south Germany.
 
FVD have now released a Stage 2 Power Kit for the 718 2.5t S and GTS models priced at 3600 Euros plus shipping. The power and torque increases are substantial, 430 bhp and 415 lbs/ft torque. For £'s spent this is an impressive upgrade.
 
Not that I am interested in modifying my GTS, it is plenty fast enough for my current requirements which is mainly touring. However I thought I'd mention this, as I can foresee the possibility of some 718 GTS owners being tempted to consider such an upgrade after the manufacturers warranty expires. A 718 GTS with Cup 2's and the X81 suspension and PCCB options fitted would be a very handy track day tool with this power kit upgrade installed. The 718 GTS will never sound like a GT4, but you can bet your bottom dollar it would be a serious challenger on a twisty track with this upgrade.     
 
I can only dream.......
 
Were I 20 years younger and fully fit, I would be thinking of taking a trip across to Germany to FVD to have this kit installed at their premises after my GTS warranty expired. The fun I would have at track days! 
 
Brian
 
 
                    
post edited by BJ Innes - 2019/04/11 16:54:01

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Nairnshire,
Highlands
Previous:
2007 Cayman 987.1 2.7 Manual.
2010 Cayman S 987.2 Manual
2012 Cayman R Manual
2015 Abarth 595 Competizione 180
2016 718 Cayman S PDK
2019 718 Cayman GTS PDK
Current:
Gen 2 Macan Turbo

ralphmusic
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Re: My 2019 718 Cayman GTS PDK 2019/04/11 17:10:22 (permalink)
Brian,
 
You should see my piece in PP re tuning and the turbo cost/hp ratio revolution. I mention 9e and Litchfield so I'd think you can use UK tuners.
 
On other upgrades for NA fans, BGB Florida have installed PDK in a road GT4 (they did a manual installation for a 991.1 GT3RS) and Ehresmann will install a 991.2 GT3 engine in a Cayman, for somewhat more.
 
Lots of choices these days.
 
Ralph

Modified Register - Asst RS
modified@porscheclubgb.com
R15 Devon
12 - RSRTC
GT3 991.2
Gone:
718 GT4
981 3.8L Cayman S
997.2 Carrera GTS
Brian_Innes
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Re: My 2019 718 Cayman GTS PDK 2019/04/11 19:15:34 (permalink)
Ralph,
 
Indeed, lots of choices for modified fans there.....
 
Current emissions regs are keeping new cars on a very tight leash. Good to see the tuners stepping up their game to keep us interested.
 
At heart, I am modifier. My very first car, a 1963 848cc Mini was treated to a Stage 1 Downton cylinder head and carburettor conversion after saving up my overtime money.
 
The future is to go modified for ICE fans in the years ahead.
 
Brian 
 
       

Nairnshire,
Highlands
Previous:
2007 Cayman 987.1 2.7 Manual.
2010 Cayman S 987.2 Manual
2012 Cayman R Manual
2015 Abarth 595 Competizione 180
2016 718 Cayman S PDK
2019 718 Cayman GTS PDK
Current:
Gen 2 Macan Turbo

Brian_Innes
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Re: My 2019 718 Cayman GTS PDK 2019/04/12 17:53:40 (permalink)
Before the Easter tourists arrive en masse on my favourite Highland routes, I had a very enjoyable day trip to the Falls of Shin visitor centre near Lairg in Sutherland. I took the scenic route via the Struie viewpoint on the B9176 from my home town near Inverness. The roads were practically traffic free, and the route I chose is a superb driver's road where the handling excellence and big torque of the GTS makes light work of the flowing bends and steep hills. On this occasion I'll spare you yet another photo of my car on an empty road following the contours of the land to the far distant horizon. Suffice to say I had a great drive, and all safely enjoyed without extending the 60 mph speed limit by more than the 10% rule. It is this sort of driving, and on roads such as these, that the 718 Cayman GTS excels.  
 
Which brings me on to my next topic. Motor mag journalists and their populism banter clearly aimed at the cynical and guffawing reader.
 
I am an occasional reader of 3 well known and respected motor magazines, the oldest of which, I have been reading for more than 50 years. Motor Sport, Autocar and EVO are the magazines I am referring to. In the current May 2019 edition of EVO I took particular interest in an article on page 120, regarding a track test comparison between an RPM Technik modified 911 996 3.6 Carrera and a manual 718 Cayman GTS. The premise was, you had £75,000 to spend on a car that would enthral on both road and track. Which would you choose? New or something more bespoke. The 911 case was built around a tired 2001 - 2005 996 Carrera manual. We were told plenty are available at around £15,000, or a new well-optioned 718 Cayman GTS.
 
The 996 was given the works by RPM Technik, taking the car to full CSR spec at an eye-watering £60,995 for the conversion including VAT and fitting. The result was a track focused, drifting, machine complete with customer specced mechanical LSD, KW 3-way coil-overs, anti-roll bars and much more besides. All very interesting and informative so far.
 
It was when the journalist came to describing the 718 Cayman GTS that I took particular exception to. The engine was described as follows, "a nasty four-cylinder turbo engine that sounds like an old tumble drier running on an uneven floor". Is this supposed to be funny? Exactly who is this drivel aimed at, other than the guffawing ranks of the 718 naysayers who cannot abide anything good to be said of the flat-4 turbo. So the Subaru and GT86 flat-4 turbos must also be similarly described. This is not serious journalism. It's merely pandering to the juvenile sector of readership who relish poking fun at anything related to the 718. When it came to the track test itself, on a wet and miserable Bedford Autodrome, the 718 GTS was again criticised as being difficult to power slide, with an LSD differential that sat nervously between grip and snapping sideways, often after brutal provocation into terminal oversteer. The CSR 996 on the other hand was a pure delight to power slide at will. An attitude which it would happily do all day. So long as you were not picking up the tyre bill afterwards.
 
The 718 Cayman GTS is not designed for power sliding or drifting, as the modified 996 clearly was set up to do. The 718 GTS forte is precision handling on a tidy line carrying big speed into and out of the corners. To be fair, the journalist did concede that the 718 Cayman GTS is an effortless everyday companion that excels on any driver's B-road with a dexterity and competency that is extraordinarily good. Then completely trashed it by adding that it was brilliant car in search of an engine to do justice to rest of the chassis. What absolute tosh!
 
Please forgive my rant, but I have no problem with serious constructive journalism of the kind written by the likes of Andrew Frankel, who writes in Motor Sport and Autocar magazines. It is only when gratuitous, unfair criticism is levelled at the 718 engine that I feel the need to speak out.           
 
 
Everyone is entitled to their opinion. Following my ownership of two 718 Caymans on both road and track, this particular EVO article is simply entertaining hyperbole. It bears no relationship to the 718 Cayman GTS that I am currently enjoying.
 
Brian     
 
          
 
  
 
 
 
               
 
 
 
         

Nairnshire,
Highlands
Previous:
2007 Cayman 987.1 2.7 Manual.
2010 Cayman S 987.2 Manual
2012 Cayman R Manual
2015 Abarth 595 Competizione 180
2016 718 Cayman S PDK
2019 718 Cayman GTS PDK
Current:
Gen 2 Macan Turbo

Wollemi
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Wollemi PCGB Member
Re: My 2019 718 Cayman GTS PDK 2019/04/12 23:48:22 (permalink)
Nothing to forgive in your  “rant“ Brian. It was a very entertaining and as always well written and well argued.
 
i had the pleasure of using a 718S (Boxster) for four days whilst my 987.2 was being serviced. I can certainly agree that the 718 is a very effective and capable sports car, with the chassis and particularly the steering significantly improved over the 981.
 
I do agree that the comparison the the magazine makes between a modified 996 and a new 718GTS is really comparing two very different cars. I for one, and I suspect you too Brian, have always preferred the precision and balance and accuracy of Porsches mid engined cars over the the more tail happy rear weighted behaviour of a 911. I am happy to accept that if one has the skills of a Vic Elford then you can use the 911s rear weight to great effect and gain great rewards from doing so. I know my limitations. 
 
The flat four turbo engine certainly has huge torque from low revs which does indeed make it very easy and relaxed to drive briskly, especially in the manner you describe, Brian.
 
I'm afraid I have to say that I just didn't like or enjoy sound of the engine and exhaust noise but I do accept this is entirely personal. I have nothing against flat four engines with turbos; I ran Imprezas for eight years. The problem for me is NOT that it sounds like a Subaru, it would be better if it DID sound more like a Subaru. 
 
Turbo engines are generally fairly muted so I’m guessing that it's an attempt to make it sound more ”interesting” that Porsche have made it make the noise that it does, and for me this is not successful. A well muted soft  growl would be much preferable, and if I was lucky enough to own a 718 I would be looking for options to make it quieter. I’m given to understand that there is also a system for feeding in artificial sound which may also be a culprit, I think there is a way to turn this off?  I certainly preferred to drive this car, a 2018 model, with the PSE off. And driven as you describe with the engine hardly called upon to deliver much of its ample reserves of power it is a very competant and relaxed car. I can see why you are so taken with it, it's an excellent car.
post edited by Wollemi - 2019/04/13 11:28:29
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