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Servicing the brakes

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Lancerlot
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2018/09/08 17:22:32 (permalink)

Servicing the brakes

One thing that’s guaranteed to wear out on your Macan are the brakes. How long they last depends on any number of factors, but at around 37K miles, I was starting to think ours weren’t going to last much longer.
 
Sure enough, an inspection confirmed the front pads of the Macan SD were wearing a bit thin. It’s not due for a service for a while yet, so I decided to address the matter myself. By the time I’d got around to it, the rotors also had some wear ridges and, since the callipers must be removed to replace the pads, I thought it a worthwhile investment to replace the discs at the same time. Here is my way of doing it and I hope it may help anyone else thinking about tackling a similar project.
 
I ordered the parts directly from my Porsche Centre (with my PCGB discount, of course). Cheaper aftermarket bits are available, but I really don’t think it’s worth the risk of fitting potentially inferior kit when it comes to brakes when bearing in mind the old adage, "buy cheap- buy twice!” Porsche discs have no markings to show their origins, but the pads are labelled Textar. Anyway here we go…..
 
Front brakes components to be fitted
 
Keeping the car on the ground and with PDK in “park” and parking brake on, slacken off the wheel nuts and jack up a front corner of the car.
 
Slacken the wheel nuts
 
Macan uses rather fragile plastic jacking points, quite easily damaged if using them directly to take the weight of the car.I made up some blocks that fit into the oblong recesses of these and stand just proud of the surface so the jack lifts on these. Once off the ground, you’ll need to place an axle stand, block or something similar under the car as a safety measure in case it should slip off the jack.
 
 
Jacking using an oblong block for the recess 
 
With the wheel off, you can see the calliper is secured by 2 x M14 retaining bolts. These are cap-heads and require a M14-12 point Torx-type socket to remove. This little tool defied my toolbox kit, but I managed to borrow one from my friendly Indy motor engineer just down the road.
Before removing these bolts, disconnect the wear indicator fitted to the rearmost brake pad. You can do this either by prising it away from the pad itself or, as like me, disconnect it from the junction at the rear of the suspension upright. This is fitted to an ‘L’ bracket and is basically a plug and socket setup. The front section has a latch and, once depressed, you can separate the female part, leaving the male part still attached to the bracket. To remove this, there’s a slot in the bracket and you need to release it by lifting the plastic finger that locates it, then turn 90o, so that it can be slid out of the bracket slot.
Once removed, you can discard the calliper retaining bolts as they are stretch bolts and should only be used once, then gently tap the calliper with a soft nose mallet to loosen it from its mounting and remove it from the rotor. Support it to one side or hang it from a suspension arm, using a hook. Don’t put any strain on the hydraulic hose that is still connected.
 
Here's the wear sensor lead and the latch on the connector
 
The disc is simply secured by a single countersunk grub screw - just use a T30 bit and then gently tap to remove it.
 
New brake rotor fitted and secured with grub screw 
 
Remove the old pads and the cross springs at the rear. If you have access to an airline blow the calliper through to remove loose dust and grime, then thoroughly clean it with WD40, IPA or methylated spirit. Once dry, you need to retract the pistons into the calliper in order to make way for the new, thicker pads. My method is to fix a piece of clear plastic tubing to the bleed nipple, loosen it, then push each piston back using a ‘G’ clamp. This will draw off some of the hydraulic fluid from the system, but without letting air back in. There are 3 reasons for this: a) It makes retracting the pistons much easier: b.) It gets rid of old, potentially contaminated fluid immediately behind each piston: and c.) it reduces the volume of fluid in the reservoir that would otherwise be overfilled once the thicker pads are fitted.
 
When the calliper is clean and all pistons retracted, it’s time to insert new pads. Firstly, ensure the pins in the calliper that locate each pad are clean and free from burs. The pads need to be free-moving along these pins, so I lightly smear them with Optimol TA paste to facilitate this. Next push the cross springs into their locating slots in the calliper and smear the touching surfaces lightly with a non-metal-containing grease. Use a light smear of the same grease on the back of each pad in the areas coming into contact with the pistons. Light pressure is needed to refit the pads against the springs and onto the pins.
 
Calliper Components
 
Calliper fitted with new pads and springs ready to refit
 
Next ensure the mating calliper and hub surfaces are clean and free of burs, then refit the calliper using new stretch bolts. These are torqued to 30 Nm, then further tightened with another 90o turn to provide the correct final tightness – this is as per official workshop manual instructions.
 
Refit the wheels and tighten to wheel nuts to 160 Nm (118 Ibs/ft.), ideally this should be done with the car off the ground, so you might need to solicit the help of an assistant to press the brake pedal. You will be aware initially, the pedal will be long until slack in system is taken up but, after a couple of pumps, the pedal should be full and solid. Don’t make the mistake of driving onto the highway, before you have pumped the pedal a few times! 
 
Finally check the brake reservoir. There are min and max levels marked on the side of it and these are just visible through the aperture in the apron at the rear of the engine compartment.
 
Inspection aperture to check brake fluid level  
 
If you're unsure, you can remove the apron completely in order to expose the brake fluid reservoir. There are 4 clips at the front, released using a screwdriver and it can then be pulled forwards,
 
Apron removed exposing the brake fluid reservoir
 
Road test the car and use the brakes lightly for a couple of hundred miles to give everything a chance to bed in. After this you should be able use them more aggressively.
 
Good luck to anybody contemplating this service and I hope this has been of some help to you.
 
Regards,
 
Clive
post edited by Lancerlot - 2018/09/08 18:38:07

The older I get - the faster I was!
Past - 924T, '911 SC, 911 C, 911 C2, 964, 996, 996TT, 997TT, 997GT2, 430 Scuderia, 997TT, 997TTS, 991.2TTS. Current -Macan S.

21 Replies

Hotfire2000
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Re: Servicing the brakes 2019/06/14 23:35:10 (permalink)
Excellent detail - Thank you
delboystoy
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delboystoy Guest of the Club
Re: Servicing the brakes 2019/06/17 13:05:16 (permalink)
Thanks Clive but far too lazy these days to be crawling around under a car I prefer to buy all the parts and get my local indie to do all the hard work !! 1/4 price for labour there.
Lancerlot
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Re: Servicing the brakes 2019/06/17 13:11:43 (permalink)
Quite understandable with the problems you've been having. However, you don't need to get under the car - it's all done from the side. 
Regards,
 
Clive

The older I get - the faster I was!
Past - 924T, '911 SC, 911 C, 911 C2, 964, 996, 996TT, 997TT, 997GT2, 430 Scuderia, 997TT, 997TTS, 991.2TTS. Current -Macan S.
tscaptain
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Re: Servicing the brakes 2019/06/17 14:51:29 (permalink)
delboystoy
 1/4 price for labour there.


Crikey, you had better tell us who they are! I'm sure there are a lot of readers who could do with paying under £40 per hour for labour.



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delboystoy
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delboystoy Guest of the Club
Re: Servicing the brakes 2019/06/17 15:11:56 (permalink)
Really, you don't have a small local garage that is more than capable of fitting a set of brakes and disc's and charging less than £30 an hour ? Thought every town had a decent little garage they used for small jobs like that as well as sorting out the MOT as you forget it was due a week ago !!
delboystoy
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delboystoy Guest of the Club
Re: Servicing the brakes 2019/06/17 15:17:42 (permalink)
Maybe should have not used the word 'indie' then and used the word 'local' :-)
Hotfire2000
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Re: Servicing the brakes 2019/06/17 20:28:13 (permalink)
I have a 'local' guy and he's £30 per hour; an absolute diamond with 'mechanical stuff' but won't touch electronics but as like most of he knows a man who can!!
R Benny Waered
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Re: Servicing the brakes 2019/11/28 12:04:30 (permalink)
Good info thanks.  There is such a crazy mark up on the pads that I'm tempted to DIY too on my Macan PP.  I understand that I'll need the new caliper bolts as they are single use. 
 
Can I ask what pads did you use - Porsche dealer sourced ones or did you just go direct to Textar as I can see the brand in the pics... 
 
Also did you have 6 pot fronts like me and thus likely same pads?
 
Rears could be trickier out of interest as you need disgnostics to wind back the handbrake caliper...
 
Cheers
Lancerlot
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Lancerlot PCGB Member
Re: Servicing the brakes 2019/11/28 13:39:52 (permalink)
I
R Benny Waered

 
 Can I ask what pads did you use - Porsche dealer sourced ones or did you just go direct to Textar as I can see the brand in the pics... 
 


"……...I ordered the parts directly from my Porsche Centre (with my PCGB discount, of course). Cheaper aftermarket bits are available, but I really don’t think it’s worth the risk of fitting potentially inferior kit when it comes to brakes ………"
Yes, 6 pot callipers.
Regards,
 
Clive
 


The older I get - the faster I was!
Past - 924T, '911 SC, 911 C, 911 C2, 964, 996, 996TT, 997TT, 997GT2, 430 Scuderia, 997TT, 997TTS, 991.2TTS. Current -Macan S.
delboystoy
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Re: Servicing the brakes 2019/11/28 14:15:50 (permalink)
Worth trying Design 911 (Also get a PCGB discount)(No i don't work for them) and then you could go for something a bit better such as BREMBO or EBC, just a thought and always worth shopping around if you can save a few quid.
R Benny Waered
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Re: Servicing the brakes 2019/11/28 14:51:26 (permalink)
Ok - they aren't quite the same part number as my six pots it seems but just for reference here are the Textar pads for mine - same brand as OE and under half the cost at £70.  https://www.onlinecarparts.co.uk/textar-7689244.html 
 
 
I've always done my own brakes like you, but am flat out with the business at the mo,  but the dealer deal for both axles fitted is about £800.  Just before Xmas!!!
 
For ref I do respect the 'stick to standard' argument as  I put Porterfield pads on the Aston but am not that keen on the harder brake feel (harder pads...), so, although it saved a fortune, retaining the brake feel by having same as OE is I think important.
CamGTS
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Re: Servicing the brakes 2020/02/15 10:16:57 (permalink)
very helpful - now do you have the same for rears?
I understand you need diagnostics to rewind the parking brake??
Lancerlot
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Re: Servicing the brakes 2020/02/15 12:52:57 (permalink)
Procedure for the rears is much the same as fronts with exception of negotiating the e-brake. In this case, put chocks under the front wheels and release the EB before starting. 
 
PC's can place the vehicle into service mode via the piwis and this winds the EB back, but we mortals have to do it manually by removing the cylinder from the rear of the calliper (2 bolts), then winding the centre adjuster back using a ratchet and suitable torx bit. 
 
Once the EB is removed, the calliper piston can be retracted in the usual way to make room for the new pads, prior to refitting the EB and calliper.
 
I'll try and do a pictorial when the time comes to do mine.
 
Regards,
 
Clive 

The older I get - the faster I was!
Past - 924T, '911 SC, 911 C, 911 C2, 964, 996, 996TT, 997TT, 997GT2, 430 Scuderia, 997TT, 997TTS, 991.2TTS. Current -Macan S.
CamGTS
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Re: Servicing the brakes 2020/02/17 13:37:01 (permalink)
thanks so all very straightforward then
I see it's a TRW caliper fitted with Ferodo brake pads. who makes the OEM discs for Porsche?
R Benny Waered
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Re: Servicing the brakes 2020/02/17 14:03:34 (permalink)
Mine was Brembo with Texstar pads - just did the fronts on a 6 pot.
CamGTS
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Re: Servicing the brakes 2020/03/04 19:19:43 (permalink)
OK so I finally got round to doing rear discs and pads on my Macan GTS and it is very straightforward provided you do it in the correct way. So usual of jacking up rear and removing wheels. Turn ignition on and release EPB then switch off ignition. Parking brake will stay off. Remove wear connector by tilting and turning 1/4 turn. There is no need to remove connector to the EPB motor but you can if you want. Next remove the EPB motor - 2 smallish torx on rear. Now this is the important bit - before you do anything else like trying to remove calipers etc you need to put the caliper into service mode. You do this by turning the female torx on the back of the caliper clockwise until it stops. No need for a wrench as it is only finger tight. Once you've done this the piston caliper can be pushed back. Note it is not a screw type and it's easiest to do this with the old pads/discs still in place. If you put a screwdriver down through the top of the caliper at the "U" section and pull it towards you the piston will retract quite easily (remember to remove brake fluid reservoir cap). Once the piston is retracted fully back it is a simple case of removing the 2 bolts holding the caliper and lifting it off the caliper carrier along with the pads. Again no need to remove the caliper carrier and if you are replacing the discs you can still get the old disc out and the new one in without removing the carrier. Remove all the old parts and replace with new pad spring carriers, new pads (and new discs if required - my rear discs and pads  were more worn that the fronts surprisingly) and new wear indicators (lube as required).  Refit the EPB motor. Now here is an another important bit. Once you have everything in place and tightened you need to apply the EPB before you do anything else. You will hear it whirring in the same way as usual when you apply the EPB but it will take a lot longer - up to 10-15 secs. Now you can push the brake pedal which should be firm. I did this cycle a few times just to be sure. Refit wheels, torque etc. Fire it up and drive forward gently and apply foot brake - all should be good. Also drive forward and apply the EPB - it should go into emergency brake mode and bring you to a halt. Finally check the "hold" feature is working by applying foot brake when stationary - again you should hear the EPB working.
Once I had worked out the correct way to do this it only took about 15 mins each side. Sorry but I didn't take photos but hopefully this is detailed enough.
,As for parts the caliper is VW/Audi TRW and the old pads that came out were TRW pads so if you use TRW they will be same as factory fit/OEM. I fitted Ferodo. No marking on the discs that came off but I used Brembos which have painted edges so don't rust and look as bad as OEM Porsche discs once rusty. All parts were from buycarparts.co.uk in Berlin - for just £133.00 as follows
09.B969.11Brake Disc2
FDB4410Brake Pad Set, disc brake1
LX0383Accessory Kit, disc brake pads1
98046500Warning Contact, brake pad wear1
GBP 132,98 
SteveTTT
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Re: Servicing the brakes 2020/03/10 13:04:49 (permalink)
Fantastically helpful, many thanks. I know someone who just got taken for a huge cost by an OPC for new pads and discs all round on a 40k miles diesel S. I’m at 31k, just extended the warranty and they “recommended“ new pads and discs at the next service (due in 6 months). The first MOT just passed today and no hint of any brake advisory on pads or discs. I have quite a bit of experience on 911s and other quick cars and to me it looks like there’s 2 years life left! It will be a DIY job when the time comes.
R Benny Waered
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Re: Servicing the brakes 2020/03/10 15:27:21 (permalink)
I had Brembo OE calipers on my six pot fronts and the OE pads that came off were Texstar.  I don't know what the TRW Brake System is - it even says that on the Brembo replacement pads here https://www.buycarparts.co.uk/brembo/11804372  I note this one says it comes with caliper bolts as they are one use jobbies, and of course very expensive from dealers (£24).
 
My tip is get the bits well in advance as who knows what comes with what - I like the feel of the Texstars and they have a big anti squeal plate on the back so seems a good buy. I guess we should not automatically assume its the same compound as Porsche buy from them though? But likely is!
CamGTS
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Re: Servicing the brakes 2020/03/11 21:21:43 (permalink)
The TRW brakes are for the rear. Yes Brembo and Texstar seem to be OEM at the front
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