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Helpful ReplyHot!Jacking the car

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yanni
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yanni PCGB Member
2021/06/11 20:50:21 (permalink)

Jacking the car

Hi!
 
Is it ok to simply Jack the car at the rear mount point so I can take the wheel off and clean the breaks? I'd generally leave to the garage but I'm planning quite a few track days and wouldn't mind the extra check.
 
Ian
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Twinfan
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Re: Jacking the car 2021/06/11 20:57:03 (permalink)
Yep, it's as simple as that.  I'll be swapping over to my track wheels this weekend and I'm planning on using the front and rear jack points to lift the car just enough to remove the wheels.
 
You can actually use the rear one to get the car high enough to take both off at the same time if you're feeling brave...
yanni
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Re: Jacking the car 2021/06/12 06:50:43 (permalink)
Amazing! Thank you.
Motorhead
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Re: Jacking the car 2021/06/12 08:52:58 (permalink) ☄ Helpfulby Nicks 2021/06/12 19:54:11
Ian,
 
I agree with Dave’s comment and just make sure that you use the correct jacking points to lift the car … and for safety’s sake, make sure you support the car with axle stands!
 
Jacking pads like these will make the job much easier:
 
https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/273516844526?_trkparms=aid%3D1110006%26algo%3DHOMESPLICE.SIM%26ao%3D1%26asc%3D20200818143230%26meid%3D1d5321d47094478e97fe8a9621c662de%26pid%3D101224%26rk%3D4%26rkt%3D5%26sd%3D283219739590%26itm%3D273516844526%26pmt%3D1%26noa%3D1%26pg%3D2047675%26algv%3DDefaultOrganic&_trksid=p2047675.c101224.m-1
 
Jeff

987.2 Cayman S
North Beds (R10 & R24)
Twinfan
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Re: Jacking the car 2021/06/12 11:40:46 (permalink)
Where's the best place to put the axle stands, Jeff?  Jacking points are easily identified but I'm never sure about the stands...
Motorhead
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Re: Jacking the car 2021/06/12 12:19:38 (permalink) ☄ Helpfulby TDT 2021/06/13 00:05:06
I use the actual jacking points Dave. I find that my trolley jack can lift the car at say the rear jacking point sufficient to get a Halfords axle stand and pad (see my link above) at the front jacking point and vice-versa. I just do one wheel at a time.
 
Failing that there’s plenty of advice online about choosing alternative lifting points on the front chassis member and rear suspension mounting point. Here’s an example, although probably it will be slightly different for your 718 with more underside fixings, especially at the rear, but it should give you an idea:
 
https://www.pelicanparts.com/techarticles/Boxster_Tech/01-BASICS-Jacking_Up/01-BASICS-Jacking_Up.htm
 
Jeff

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yanni
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Re: Jacking the car 2021/06/12 18:45:57 (permalink)
So. I can't just use the jack? I should use an axel mount too? Sorry if I'm being slow...
Motorhead
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Re: Jacking the car 2021/06/12 19:41:25 (permalink)
Ian,
 
It’s up to you whether or not you choose to use an axle stand, but I’d always recommend doing so even for a simple job like removing a wheel to check the pads and discs, etc.
 
Maybe my opinion is coloured by the fact that a few years ago a friend and work colleague came in one morning to report the shocking news that his father-in-law had been crushed to death by the rear axle of his vintage Alvis, I think it was, falling on him while he was working underneath the car. The car was only supported by a jack, and if he’d taken a few minutes to place an axle stand in position he’d still be alive today. To make it worse he was discovered by his wife who’d been out shopping. You can imagine the devastation caused to the family. A salutary lesson.
 
The jacking pad I mentioned in the link is very useful because the peg fits in the elongated slot in the jacking point and when you rotate it 90 degrees it stays in position and makes lining-up the trolley jack lifting pad very easy. Although others are available, that particular pad has a couple of chamfers which fit snugly into the saddle of a Halfords axle stand, making the support very stable.
 
Jeff

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TDT
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Re: Jacking the car 2021/06/13 00:08:58 (permalink)
You can easily jack the whole side of the car from either the front or Rear point, and so then can put the stand at the other point and lower onto it.
 
I have 2 jacks so just repeat for the other side and then whole car can be in the air.
post edited by TDT - 2021/06/13 00:11:31
yanni
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Re: Jacking the car 2021/06/13 06:26:33 (permalink)
A relative of mine (I was very young so don't have a lot of context) was actually killed when servicing his porsche so I understand the inherent risk. What I'm not clear on is why the jack stand is better than the jack. Is it because multiple points have been seen to (e.g. backup) or is it because they're better because they're fixed in height?
 
Really appreciate the help!
AndrewT
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Re: Jacking the car 2021/06/13 08:24:14 (permalink)
Mechanical screw type jacks can be quite unstable when extended, accidental movement of the car body while removing a wheel could cause the jack to collapse. Something like a hydraulic trolley jack, while being more stable, can suffer from hydraulic seal leakage cause a slow lowering of the jack or possible sudden and total lowering. In both cases use of an axle stand as well as the jack is wise, axle stands usually stand on three legs making them very stable, and they have no moving parts to fail (height adjustment being a solid pin through a hole). For added safety you can also slide the wheel you’ve removed under the car such that it may support the car if there is a jack collapse - this might damage the wheel but could save you serious injury should you be under the car at the time.
 
edited to add: reading a couple of other recent threads has reminded me that it makes wheel removal and replacement a lot easier if you use one of these locating lugs, I purchased mine from an OPC. https://www.design911.co.uk/fu/prod7429/Wheel-Mounting-Tool-for-Porsche/
post edited by AndrewT - 2021/06/14 08:16:36

Andrew.
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R17.
Motorhead
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Re: Jacking the car 2021/06/13 11:23:22 (permalink)
yanni
A relative of mine (I was very young so don't have a lot of context) was actually killed when servicing his porsche so I understand the inherent risk. What I'm not clear on is why the jack stand is better than the jack. Is it because multiple points have been seen to (e.g. backup) or is it because they're better because they're fixed in height?
 
Really appreciate the help!




Ian,
 
I think that Andrew has summed-up the situation succinctly. In particular I agree with him that positioning a wheel - or maybe some bricks or timber? - under the car provides an additional safety measure, especially if you don’t possess an axle stand.
 
Jeff

987.2 Cayman S
North Beds (R10 & R24)
DWaldie
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Re: Jacking the car 2021/07/22 16:21:56 (permalink)
Motorhead
Ian,
 
I agree with Dave’s comment and just make sure that you use the correct jacking points to lift the car … and for safety’s sake, make sure you support the car with axle stands!
 
Jacking pads like these will make the job much easier:
 
https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/273516844526?_trkparms=aid%3D1110006%26algo%3DHOMESPLICE.SIM%26ao%3D1%26asc%3D20200818143230%26meid%3D1d5321d47094478e97fe8a9621c662de%26pid%3D101224%26rk%3D4%26rkt%3D5%26sd%3D283219739590%26itm%3D273516844526%26pmt%3D1%26noa%3D1%26pg%3D2047675%26algv%3DDefaultOrganic&_trksid=p2047675.c101224.m-1
 
Jeff




Ice hockey pucks do a similar job and can be picked up at sports shops a good bit cheaper.
Motorhead
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Re: Jacking the car 2021/07/22 16:47:49 (permalink)
They do indeed, but the advantage of all the commercially available jacking pads is that they have a lug which engages in the elongated hole in the body jacking point, which is more secure than the flat surface of a hockey puck.
 
Having said that, most of the jacking pads are machined rubber blocks with a plastic lug screwed in position, so a competent DIY-er probably could knock-up something cheaper than the commercial offerings.
 
Jeff

987.2 Cayman S
North Beds (R10 & R24)
Twinfan
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Re: Jacking the car 2021/07/22 17:04:14 (permalink)
Motorhead
They do indeed, but the advantage of all the commercially available jacking pads is that they have a lug which engages in the elongated hole in the body jacking point, which is more secure than the flat surface of a hockey puck.
 
Having said that, most of the jacking pads are machined rubber blocks with a plastic lug screwed in position, so a competent DIY-er probably could knock-up something cheaper than the commercial offerings.
 
Jeff




I agree Jeff.  The lugs are a key aspect of the jacking pads and a very neat addition.
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