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Helpful ReplyHot!My new Gen 2 2020 Macan Turbo

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Brian_Innes
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Re: My new Gen 2 2020 Macan Turbo 2020/09/24 17:16:22 (permalink)
Winter Wheels and Tyres Delivered
A day ahead of schedule, my Porsche T-equipment winter wheels and tyres set have arrived safely. They were delivered to Porsche Centre Chester from Germany on Tuesday, then despatched north by Paisley Freight logistics on Wednesday, arriving at my home address today, Thursday. An impressively efficient service.
 
I am absolutely delighted with both the wheels and the Michelin Alpin 5 SUV N0 winter tyres. They really look the business. My first job will be to give the wheels a protective coating with Autoglym resin polish and high gloss protector, prior to storing them on the wheel rack ready for winter.
 
This delivery has come at the right time giving me a much needed boost in the midst of all the Covid -19 misery.  
 
 
A few photos below for your interest.
 
Brian
 
 
            

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Nairnshire,
Highlands
Previous:
2007 Cayman 987.1 2.7 Manual.
2010 Cayman S 987.2 Manual
2012 Cayman R Manual
2015 Abarth 595 Competizione 180
2016 718 Cayman S PDK
2019 718 Cayman GTS PDK
Current:
Gen 2 Macan Turbo

Brian_Innes
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Re: My new Gen 2 2020 Macan Turbo 2020/09/24 17:21:44 (permalink)
The packaging is substantial, and very heavy. Unpacking the wheels was not the work of a moment!
 
Brian
 

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Nairnshire,
Highlands
Previous:
2007 Cayman 987.1 2.7 Manual.
2010 Cayman S 987.2 Manual
2012 Cayman R Manual
2015 Abarth 595 Competizione 180
2016 718 Cayman S PDK
2019 718 Cayman GTS PDK
Current:
Gen 2 Macan Turbo

Brian_Innes
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Re: My new Gen 2 2020 Macan Turbo 2020/09/24 17:23:38 (permalink)
The  4 wheels are very neatly packed in heavyweight cardboard and with protective coverings between each wheel.
 
Brian
 
 
 
 

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Nairnshire,
Highlands
Previous:
2007 Cayman 987.1 2.7 Manual.
2010 Cayman S 987.2 Manual
2012 Cayman R Manual
2015 Abarth 595 Competizione 180
2016 718 Cayman S PDK
2019 718 Cayman GTS PDK
Current:
Gen 2 Macan Turbo

Brian_Innes
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Re: My new Gen 2 2020 Macan Turbo 2020/09/24 17:25:41 (permalink)
The tread pattern on the Michelin Alpin 5 N0 tyres look ideal for winter weather.
 
Brian
 
 
 

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Nairnshire,
Highlands
Previous:
2007 Cayman 987.1 2.7 Manual.
2010 Cayman S 987.2 Manual
2012 Cayman R Manual
2015 Abarth 595 Competizione 180
2016 718 Cayman S PDK
2019 718 Cayman GTS PDK
Current:
Gen 2 Macan Turbo

Brian_Innes
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Re: My new Gen 2 2020 Macan Turbo 2020/09/24 17:26:43 (permalink)
The sidewall designation confirms SUV compatibility.
 
Brian
 
 

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Nairnshire,
Highlands
Previous:
2007 Cayman 987.1 2.7 Manual.
2010 Cayman S 987.2 Manual
2012 Cayman R Manual
2015 Abarth 595 Competizione 180
2016 718 Cayman S PDK
2019 718 Cayman GTS PDK
Current:
Gen 2 Macan Turbo

Motorhead
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Re: My new Gen 2 2020 Macan Turbo 2020/09/24 19:57:29 (permalink)
That looks like a seriously grippy tread pattern Brian! Just what you need with all that power and torque when the temperatures head downwards in the coming weeks.
 
Looking forward to reading about your exploits north of the border during the winter months.
 
Jeff

987.2 Cayman S
North Beds (R10 & R24)
Brian_Innes
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Re: My new Gen 2 2020 Macan Turbo 2020/09/27 17:05:24 (permalink)
The Knockhill track test is coming up this week. The purpose is to explore the full dynamic performance of the Macan Turbo on a closed and controlled environment away from the restrictions of the public roads. It is also an ideal opportunity for me to get to know my car better. Knockhill is a track I know very well with many happy memories of professional tutoring, motorsport competition events, and numerous track days, enjoyed over the past 32 years.       
 
Having been used to the planted, secure, agile, chassis of the Cayman, I am not expecting the Macan to be particularly at home on the race track. The higher centre of gravity and near two tonne weight will temper corner entry speeds and extend the braking distances. That said, I shall be very interested to see how the Porsche development engineers have tuned the Macan chassis to cope with the powerful (440bhp), and torquey (550Nm), 2.9 twin-turbo V6. My car has all the sporty options fitted, and Michelin tyres, so it will also be a good opportunity to test those as well, including launch control which cannot legally be tested properly on the public road.  
 
I have an exclusive one hour slot booked during the bike track day lunch break. Photographs have also been organised with the resident photographer. I shall be using the quirky Porsche Track Precision app. I have a windscreen mount in place for my phone and I'm hoping I can get the app to record the dynamic data for my Macan. I'll also use the on-board PCM Chrono lap recorder. It's also a quirky thing to operate, and my plan is to start the lap recorder at the beginning of my track session and leave it recording until I've finished the session. My plan is to do no more than a maximum of 15 - 20 laps of the 1.4 mile circuit, which shall be more than enough for the purposes of this evaluation test.
 
A report will follow in due course.
 
Brian             
 
    
 
 

Nairnshire,
Highlands
Previous:
2007 Cayman 987.1 2.7 Manual.
2010 Cayman S 987.2 Manual
2012 Cayman R Manual
2015 Abarth 595 Competizione 180
2016 718 Cayman S PDK
2019 718 Cayman GTS PDK
Current:
Gen 2 Macan Turbo

Wollemi
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Re: My new Gen 2 2020 Macan Turbo 2020/09/28 10:16:24 (permalink)
I hope that that the Track Precision app works better for you than it does for me. Although it w
has connected to my car, and indeed produced a video and data from a pretend “track” I created near home, it’s ability to connect subsequently has been sporadic. 


At Croft in August, it resolutely refused to connect despite being disconnected and reconnected several times. Talking to other users in the paddock it seems that this is not uncommon. 


Prior to going to Oulton Park last week, I had had some conversations with people from the assistance section at Porsche, and completely deleted and re-installed the app. Imagine my delight when on first launching it I got the red circl saying ready to go. Great I thought! I didn’t attempt to mount the phone on the windscreen without some suitable secondary tether but was happy to record the data. I didn’t attempt to try operating with Apple Car Play either. I just the phone in the specified place in the armrest, and off it went. 

Everytime I went out it connected and said ready to go. I didn’t try to look at the data whilst wearing my contact lenses. It would be impossible. 

Next day, I sat down to have a good look at all the data I had been recording, or so I thought. Three laps had been recorded, and only one properly. 

lap 1 - fine and interesting. Lap 2 had four laps overlaid one on top of the other and recorded a maximum speed of 168mph. I hadn’t realised I was going that fast. Lap 3 stopped half way round. 

(One interesting bit of data that was recorded was “wheel slip”, - up to 3% at the rear, but no front axle wheel slip. Zero understeer? Or lack of recording?)
 
I’ve sent the data to the help lady, and she’s going to send it on to Germany. 


Maybe it will work perfectly for you. I do hope so. 
 
 
 
 

Graham - R7 CoG member
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Brian_Innes
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Re: My new Gen 2 2020 Macan Turbo 2020/09/29 20:58:15 (permalink) ☄ Helpfulby AndrewCS 2020/09/29 21:59:09
Knockhill Track Test - Macan Turbo
Leaving the Moray Firth sunshine behind, I headed south via the A939, A95, and A9, towards the damp and gloomy skies of the Forth Valley, Dunfermline,  and the Knockhill race circuit. I had pre-booked a one hour exclusive track session including both static and action track photos by the resident photographer Iain Struthers. I had decided this was to be my final drive on a race track and I considered the occasion worth recording for posterity.
 
With the static photos completed, I set out on the track primarily for an evaluation exercise to appraise the Macan Turbo on a closed circuit for my own personal driving satisfaction, and to get to know the car better. The additional purpose being to relate my opinions to those interested, covering the car’s dynamic abilities in the braking and handling departments, including the engine and transmission performance of this illustrious flagship of the Macan model range.
 
Weighing in at close to two tonnes, with a high centre of gravity, and with a big lump of an engine mounted high in the chassis and set forward of the front axle line, is not the ideal configuration for a track friendly car. Added to that, a streaming wet Knockhill with its technically demanding undulating dips and blind crests, did not inspire confidence, even for an experienced wheel-smith such as myself. 
 
The initial tentative laps established pretty much what I had expected of the car. Two things immediately stood out. The Macan’s lardy weight and dominant understeering characteristics required a major recalibration of the braking and turn-in points on the track compared to my previous, balletic, 718 Cayman GTS. Once I became acclimatised, the Macan pedalled along reasonably well bearing in mind this is a car well out of its comfort zone. With Sport Plus engaged I tried a few laps using both auto and manual gear shifting. The gearing turned out not to be particularly track friendly either, with gears 1, 2, and 3, being quite short with a noticeable gap to 4th gear. This is perfectly understandable, as Macan owners may use the car for towing horse boxes, caravans and trailers etc, where longer intermediate gear ratios would be a distinct disadvantage. For Knockhill the Macan Turbo’s gear ratios were not ideal, with 2nd and 3rd gears being too short, and 4th too long for the tighter sections of the circuit. I settled on using 3rd and 4th for all the corners excepting the hairpin where 2nd gear was best in the wet conditions. Here, the car pulled strongly exiting the tight, 30 mph hairpin. The 4WD mapping directing the torque predominately to the front axle, and I could sense the front wheels powering the car out of the corner and onwards to the uphill start-finish straight. Very little understeer was apparent at this corner due to the torque balance biased towards the front 
axle, as I unwound the steering lock and PTV activated to help rotate the car around the hairpin bend.      
 
One big surprise was the performance of the Porsche Surface Coated brakes, PSCB. Having had extensive experience with Porsche Carbon Ceramic Brakes PCCB, on my 718 Cayman GTS, I expected great things from PSCB being the standard fitment on the Turbo model. This turned out not to be the case on this race track unfortunately. On normal public roads  PSCB performs extremely well, providing a reassuring “bite” and an excellent pedal feel. On the track it proved to be a very different story. Owing to the wet track conditions, braking points were much earlier for the high speed stops. Knockhill has two such stops per lap. The first being a medium brake at over 100 mph for Turn 1, Duffus Dip, the second more severe stop is also from 100 mph plus, for Turn 7 the 30 mph hairpin. After only 2 fairly brisk laps I already became aware of the distinctive pungent smell from the brakes the inside of the car. The photographer at the trackside also noted the distinctive aroma of hot brakes as I was circulating around the track. Following this first exploratory lap session, I returned to the pit lane after 5 laps to find smoke billowing from the front brakes. They were very hot indeed! This surprised me, as I am well practised in braking techniques and avoid jumping on the brake pedal. I roll off the throttle on approach to the braking area and squeeze the brake pedal progressively. The wet conditions  should also have served to cool the brakes between corners. I came to the opinion that the weight of the Macan combined with the two 100 mph stops per lap, tested the PSCB far beyond what would be expected on the public road. Even more disconcerting, the Macan brake pedal feel also became soft as the brake temperatures increased. By comparison, my PCCB equipped 718 Cayman GTS previously lapped Knockhill at far higher speeds in the dry, with dramatically shorter braking distances without any adverse affects. It goes without saying, that very few Macan owners will venture to take their cars onto the track, and even fewer will push their cars to the same extent I did on this particular day. This was after all said and done, performance driving towards the car’s limits on a closed circuit. 
 
On a more positive note, the chassis performance was acceptable for a car of this class on a race track, with body roll well controlled and the steering providing the driver with a decent feel of what the front wheels were doing. My car has the Power Steering Plus option which I have always specced as I find it better suited to my particular driving style. The Michelin Latitude Sport 3 N2 tyres performed very well on the wet track. The road grip was excellent, enabling the occasional wheel to become airborne as I my confidence and pace with the car improved.
The Porsche Track Precision app which I had hoped would record essential dynamic data, failed to connect with the PCM at Knockhill for reasons unknown. It’s quirky at the best of times. I didn’t have the time to faff with it.    
 
Before my allotted track time came to a close, I performed a launch control start from the main straight starting grid. This Sport Chrono option requires a certain degree of mechanical detachment while deploying this feature. To put it mildly, it is brutal! The documented procedure is as follows; 
 
Sport Plus activated, select “D” on the gear selector.
Left foot firmly on the brake pedal.
Quickly floor the throttle pedal.
Revs stabilise at 5000 rpm.
Immediately release the brake pedal. 
 
The Macan is launched towards the horizon akin to a jet fighter taking off from an aircraft carrier. Even on a wet track, I recorded a 0-60 time of 4.12 seconds timed from my phone stopwatch. Very, very, impressive, and another accolade for the wet road grip of the Michelin tyres. To propel two tonnes of car from a standing start in such a brutal fashion places huge strains on the gearbox, clutches, and drive train. I wouldn’t recommend making a habit of this particular feature. I doubt I shall ever use this feature again.   
 
In conclusion, I am now more acquainted with my Macan Turbo’s dynamic  capabilities. I found the experience at Knockhill very rewarding for exploring   the limits of the car. By any stretch of the imagination, the Macan is not a track friendly machine, such as the Cayman and Boxsters are for example. In fairness, the Macan model concept was never designed as such. The Macan makes up for this deficiency in other more practical ways, such as being supremely comfortable, eminently practical for daily driving, and with a class leading standard of driving satisfaction. Given time, I know I shall grow to love it. 
 
I’ll post a few photos of my final track driving day for your interest.
 
Photo 1 is the fearsome Duffus Dip.
 
Brian
                
 
 
post edited by Brian_Innes - 2020/10/01 15:34:57

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Nairnshire,
Highlands
Previous:
2007 Cayman 987.1 2.7 Manual.
2010 Cayman S 987.2 Manual
2012 Cayman R Manual
2015 Abarth 595 Competizione 180
2016 718 Cayman S PDK
2019 718 Cayman GTS PDK
Current:
Gen 2 Macan Turbo

Brian_Innes
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Re: My new Gen 2 2020 Macan Turbo 2020/09/29 21:01:42 (permalink)
The wet conditions were challenging.
 
 
 

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Nairnshire,
Highlands
Previous:
2007 Cayman 987.1 2.7 Manual.
2010 Cayman S 987.2 Manual
2012 Cayman R Manual
2015 Abarth 595 Competizione 180
2016 718 Cayman S PDK
2019 718 Cayman GTS PDK
Current:
Gen 2 Macan Turbo

Brian_Innes
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Re: My new Gen 2 2020 Macan Turbo 2020/09/29 21:02:46 (permalink)
Understeer very apparent on some tight corners.
 
 

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Nairnshire,
Highlands
Previous:
2007 Cayman 987.1 2.7 Manual.
2010 Cayman S 987.2 Manual
2012 Cayman R Manual
2015 Abarth 595 Competizione 180
2016 718 Cayman S PDK
2019 718 Cayman GTS PDK
Current:
Gen 2 Macan Turbo

Brian_Innes
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Re: My new Gen 2 2020 Macan Turbo 2020/09/29 21:04:51 (permalink)
Flying at the Knockhill Chicane.
 
 

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Nairnshire,
Highlands
Previous:
2007 Cayman 987.1 2.7 Manual.
2010 Cayman S 987.2 Manual
2012 Cayman R Manual
2015 Abarth 595 Competizione 180
2016 718 Cayman S PDK
2019 718 Cayman GTS PDK
Current:
Gen 2 Macan Turbo

AndrewT
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Re: My new Gen 2 2020 Macan Turbo 2020/09/30 08:26:31 (permalink)
I enjoyed reading your report Brian, and that last photograph is great 👍

Andrew.
987.2 Cayman S
Romsey, Hampshire. (R17).
Motorhead
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Re: My new Gen 2 2020 Macan Turbo 2020/09/30 09:28:39 (permalink)
Three-wheeling a Macan..! Great stuff Brian, and an interesting read and perspective.

Disappointing weather for your final track outing, but no doubt memorable all the same.
 
Jeff

987.2 Cayman S
North Beds (R10 & R24)
TimG
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Re: My new Gen 2 2020 Macan Turbo 2020/09/30 11:25:55 (permalink)
Brian,
 
I have only just come across this thread and your continued update blogs and explanation, purchase and new ownership of your Macan Turbo which I have enjoyed reading immensely. Please continue…
 
I may have somehow missed it but I’m looking forward to your investigations into the alignment given the handling characteristics you have experienced on recent trips to see if either the car has ‘settled’ or the alignment wasn’t optimum from delivery if found to be out.
 
Thanks again for the read and the enthusiasm that we all (at least the majority) share in Porsche ownership.

North Oxfordshire - R31 area
Brian_Innes
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Re: My new Gen 2 2020 Macan Turbo 2020/09/30 14:46:29 (permalink)
Thanks to all contributors for your support and encouragement. I'm always grateful, and also a little amazed at the positive responses I receive for my forum scribblings. In these seemingly relentless coronavirus times, this forum brings a little light into my life. Already this year so many doors are closing.........
 
Tim,
Regarding the wheel alignment issue. Prior to my Knockhill test, I had planned to have this checked at my local Michelin specialist as past experience with new factory delivered Porsches has shown the wheel geometry to be all over the place.
 
Unfortunately, the software data on the Hunter 4-wheel Laser rig, was not up to date enough for my 2019> Generation 2 Macan Turbo. There are subtle but important suspension ride height settings and road wheel offset changes between the Gen 1 and 2 Turbo Macans. My Michelin specialist is contacting the equipment supplier to update the data programme. Apparently this is an on-going job as manufacturers are constantly updating model specs on a regular basis.
 
On inspecting my tyres closely following the Knockhill test, I could see no obvious signs of feathering or uneven tread wear, so my wheel geometry seems to be ok.
 
When the new updated Hunter software is installed, I shall book in my car for a geo check. In case anyone is wondering why I use an independent service for this task,  rather than an OPC, the reason is twofold. Firstly, my Michelin specialist is a family owned business only 10 miles distant from my home. Secondly, I am consulted by the indie's technical staff throughout the geo check process. Unlike past experience at the nearest OPC 100 miles distant, who chose to ignore my requests and set the geometry to what they consider is appropriate. I have particular preferences for camber and toe settings which have proved very successful over the past 13 years.
 
Brian                   

Nairnshire,
Highlands
Previous:
2007 Cayman 987.1 2.7 Manual.
2010 Cayman S 987.2 Manual
2012 Cayman R Manual
2015 Abarth 595 Competizione 180
2016 718 Cayman S PDK
2019 718 Cayman GTS PDK
Current:
Gen 2 Macan Turbo

Brian_Innes
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Re: My new Gen 2 2020 Macan Turbo 2020/10/01 16:13:52 (permalink)
During my two months of Macan ownership, It's been interesting to note the various pronunciations of "Macan".
 
Both through personal encounters and viewing YouTube videos, the latter mainly being of USA origin, I have come across a number of variations. "Maa-can, "Mac-aan" being the most commonly used. Myself, I use the Scottish pronunciation, "Mac-Cann", as it comes more naturally to my home dialect. 
 
Retuning to the topic of the PSCB brakes, the front discs surface appearance are now recovering from their roasting at Knockhill. From past experience with PCCB discs after a track day, it usually takes around a month of normal public road driving for the natural surface sheen to return to normal. The braking performance and pedal feel I am glad to report, is already back to what it was before Knockhill, ie good bite and firm pedal feel.
 
If I were speccing a new Macan GTS for example, which has normal iron discs and red brake callipers as standard, I would not now spend the extra money on PSCB. The poor track performance I experienced with the PSCB brakes, on a wet day with the ambient air temperature in single figures and the few number of laps involved on this short 1.4 mile circuit in no way abused the brakes. The experience left me very disappointed. For normal road use at legal speeds the PSCB are perfectly good. In my opinion for superior braking performance, the full Monty PCCB would be my choice. I cannot help but wonder how PSCB would cope with long downhill descents, as is common in the Highlands, when towing a heavy trailer or caravan. Having the brake pedal go soft in that situation would be more than a little alarming. There again, as to how many Macan owners would fall into that category of circumstances is a moot point.     
 
Brian                          
 
       

Nairnshire,
Highlands
Previous:
2007 Cayman 987.1 2.7 Manual.
2010 Cayman S 987.2 Manual
2012 Cayman R Manual
2015 Abarth 595 Competizione 180
2016 718 Cayman S PDK
2019 718 Cayman GTS PDK
Current:
Gen 2 Macan Turbo

Lancerlot
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Re: My new Gen 2 2020 Macan Turbo 2020/10/01 16:39:47 (permalink)
Might be worth giving them a another chance, Brian. They hadn't done much mileage before you went trackside and no doubt a few high spots on rotors and pads needed sorting.
You will know from your motorsport days, competition pads require so much bedding in with a cycle of hard applications, stinking hot and maximum fade before they stabilise after cooling and then, with more light usage, produce good results.
 
Regards,
 
Clive

The older I get - the faster I was!
Past - 924T, '911 SC, 911 C, 911 C2, 964, 996, 996TT, 997TT, 997GT2, 430 Scuderia, 997TT, 997TTS, 991.2TTS. Macan SD. Raleigh bike!
Brian_Innes
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Re: My new Gen 2 2020 Macan Turbo 2020/10/01 18:48:20 (permalink)
Clive,
My Macan had already covered 2150 miles when I turned up at Knockhill for the track test. The type of roads where I live are good for bedding-in brakes. What surprised me was how quickly the PSCB overheated at Knockhill compared to past experience with both iron brakes and PCCB on my previous Caymans. I accept the vehicle weight differences between the Cayman and Macan are significant, but I expected better from Porsche on the Macan flagship Turbo, the most powerful of the model range.      
 
As you say, I'll be monitoring the braking system carefully over the coming months, and will report back accordingly.
 
Brian       

Nairnshire,
Highlands
Previous:
2007 Cayman 987.1 2.7 Manual.
2010 Cayman S 987.2 Manual
2012 Cayman R Manual
2015 Abarth 595 Competizione 180
2016 718 Cayman S PDK
2019 718 Cayman GTS PDK
Current:
Gen 2 Macan Turbo

Patrick Aschan
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Re: My new Gen 2 2020 Macan Turbo 2020/10/02 14:26:22 (permalink)
Brian_Innes
Flying at the Knockhill Chicane.
 
 


Great photo, I love that you have lifted a wheel!!
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