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Helpful ReplyHot!My new Gen 2 2020 Macan Turbo

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Brian_Innes
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Re: My new Gen 2 2020 Macan Turbo 2021/03/08 11:47:07 (permalink)
The Macan Turbo has now crossed the 5000 miles threshold and continues to be a "turn key" daily driver. Absolutely no issues whatsoever with the car in my 7 months of ownership. I am perfectly happy with the fuel consumption for such a heavy, performance orientated SUV. I am consistently achieving 28 mpg on a trunk road drive in "Normal Individual" mode which compares almost identically with my previous 718 Cayman GTS 2.5t on a similar run. In my experience, using "Sport" mode incurs a mpg penalty of around 4mpg which is perfectly reasonable given the size and weight of the car. The Gen 2 Macan Turbo has benefited from current emissions technology together with a brand new engine design which has no doubt resulted in improved economy and emissions figures compared to the previous model.
 
This current extended lockdown in Scotland continues to frustrate my travel plans. "Staying local" in the Highlands has perhaps a different interpretation from more urban and suburban communities, but nevertheless it is an irksome restriction to the lone traveller seeking the empty open spaces for solitude and fresh air exercise.
 
Looking ahead to the sunlit horizons assuming post-lockdown and vaccination roll-out, I have taken the decision to book a couple of hotels in late October 2021. With hotel accommodation bookings already surging ahead, I didn't want to take the risk of being locked out due to hotels being fully booked. My destination choices have been carefully thought out to maximise both the enjoyment and practical elements of my intended tour.
 
First stop is in the Derbyshire dales near the Chatsworth House estate. It's a beautiful area that I have visited several times before. By October my folding e-bike should be here and I intend taking it with me on the trip. My chosen location in Derbyshire has excellent off-road cycle trails to enjoy, and hopefully the weather will be kind.
 
My second stop is a hotel in Cheshire where I shall arrange an oil change service at Porsche Centre Chester. It'll also provide an excellent opportunity to meet the sales and service staff who have been so very helpful to me in the past. On the day following the oil service, Oulton Park is a scheduled event on the PCGB track day calendar. Hopefully by then, I shall be able to attend as a spectator taking my safety helmet along with the intention of having a few passenger laps with the drivers I already know from my previous visits there.
 
I accept that it is a calculated risk committing to these hotel bookings so far in advance, but we all need something to look forward to don't we? Besides, all hotels are chomping at the bit to get back to normal and offer cancellation or rescheduling options in the event of another coronavirus pandemic. Perish the thought!
 
I'll close with a few photos of the beautiful seascape views in my locality. The empty spaces and crystal clear air is a joy to behold.
 
Brian
                     
 
                   

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Brian_Innes
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Re: My new Gen 2 2020 Macan Turbo 2021/03/08 11:49:04 (permalink)
Looking east on the Dornoch Firth.
 
Brian
 

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Brian_Innes
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Re: My new Gen 2 2020 Macan Turbo 2021/03/19 11:21:12 (permalink)
Having consulted with the service assistant at OPC Chester regarding an interim engine oil service later this year, they have confirmed that Mobil 1 ESP Formula 5w-30 engine oil is recommended for my car in consideration of my driving style and geographical location. The oil service requires 7.5 litres of Mobil 1 and I have agreed with OPC Chester that I can supply my own oil for this interim service.
 
I double checked the grade of oil with both the service assistant and the Porsche Good to Know technical data. Both 0w-30 and 5W-30 Mobil 1 ESP oils are approved for my Macan Turbo. When I took delivery of my car, I received a complimentary 1 litre pack of Mobil 1 ESP 5W-30 engine oil from OPC Chester, so I'm following their recommendation. To date, with over 5000 miles recorded, I have topped-up with only 500ml of oil in order to keep the oil level at the maximum mark.
 
With the lockdown restrictions on travel within Scotland being lifted next month, I am very much looking forward to driving further afield including the north west Highlands before the summer influx of tourists descends upon us. The roads in Wester Ross for example are among my favourite driving routes. Reports will follow in due course.
 
Brian     
 
    

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Motorhead
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Re: My new Gen 2 2020 Macan Turbo 2021/03/19 13:02:08 (permalink)
Interesting to see that two grades of oil are recommended Brian. Maybe it reflects the wider market for SUVs compared with the sports cars, with greater regional temperature variations?
 
I think that you better get out driving sooner rather than later as I reckon the Highland roads are going to be extra busy this summer with all the pent-up demand and possible travel restrictions in place and a lot of people staycationing!
 
Jeff

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BrianJ
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Re: My new Gen 2 2020 Macan Turbo 2021/03/19 15:21:43 (permalink)
Hi Brian, just sent you a PM about October. 
Regards

Brian J
First 2003 986 2.7 facelift (80k in that).
Then 2009 987 Gen II Cayman S (47k in that).
Now 2013 981 Boxster S (35k so far)
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Brian_Innes
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Re: My new Gen 2 2020 Macan Turbo 2021/03/19 15:37:49 (permalink) ☄ Helpfulby AndrewCS 2021/03/19 17:21:30
Motorhead
 
I think that you better get out driving sooner rather than later as I reckon the Highland roads are going to be extra busy this summer with all the pent-up demand and possible travel restrictions in place and a lot of people staycationing!
 
Jeff




Indeed Jeff.
 
There has been much chatter in the local press about the forthcoming influx of staycation tourists. While the hospitality sector is relishing the forthcoming anticipated business, it has to be said that in much of the north Highlands both the roads and the social infrastructure is not geared up for mass tourism. Car parking and toilet facilities are currently being upgraded at many of the popular tourist stops, but as in other remote parts of the UK, this takes time, money, and the availability of local resources.
 
The narrow single-track roads of the north Highlands are not designed for camper vans and the more bulky Winnebago motorhome varieties.  In recent years, this has become a very divisive subject. Generally, motorhome tourists do not spend much money on local facilities, preferring to carry food and refreshments with them.     The passing places are generally not big enough to accommodate the larger motorhomes, and the soft verges and deep ditches are another hazard in waiting. With hotel and B&B accommodation being already in short supply, and further inhibited by social distancing constraints, the attraction of motor homes and wild camping is inevitably on the increase. The larger country house hotels located in the Highlands are becoming increasingly expensive and more exclusive, in the knowledge that some people will spend whatever it takes for luxurious comfort, fine dining, and safe parking in a secluded, scenic setting.
 
As I have said before on this forum, touring in the Highlands is all about timing. The summer months of June, July, and August, are the busiest. This is also the peak time for the dreaded midges. Over the past 5 years the tourist season in the north has started earlier and finished later. The best times are what you may call the shoulder seasons. April, May, September, and October are the best months to enjoy the Highlands without the crowds. The weather can be surprisingly mild.   
 
The North Coast 500 has been a mixed blessing. Many visitors do not spend enough time on the route to enjoy its many historical, geographical, and geological features. To do the NC500 properly you need to allow at least 4 nights of stop-overs. It's also best done anti-clockwise from Inverness. Most importantly, the NC500 is not a race. The police are taking a very robust approach to inconsiderate driving and compliance with speed limits. Punishment by example has already been featured in the past in the local press and tv news reports.
 
My advice to Highland touring newbies is, take your time. Try not to include too much in too short a timescale. Rather, take one area of the Highlands and concentrate on that locality for the duration of your tour. If you enjoy it, return another year and take in a different part of the Highlands.
 
 
To those who are planning a visit to the Highlands for the first time, I would say do your research carefully. The more time you spend planning the itinerary the more likely your trip will be a successful one. 
 
Brian
                                                          

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CamGTS
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Re: My new Gen 2 2020 Macan Turbo 2021/03/19 17:16:00 (permalink) ☄ Helpfulby AndrewCS 2021/03/19 17:21:33
Points well made Brian. There is also the huge issue of bad driving standards from UK and foreign drivers who simply have no idea how to drive on narrow or single track roads and road etiquette - a simple wave or acknowledgement when you give way seems to be a thing of the past to many. Drivers in hire cars or mobile homes that they don't know the size of. I came across an idiot in a camper take the back road down into Plockton recently who kept stopping to check he was going to clear the overhanging trees and he wasn't for letting me past either ( a common issue - ask any local).
As for the NC500 there are bits that IMHO are simply not worth doing. eg the route from Inverness up to John o Groats ( a dump - better going to Dunnet Head which is actually the northernmost point on the UK mainland with better views) and along the top to Bettyshill is pretty boring. From Bettyhill it gets good. I'd rather go up from Inverness to Lairg, Altnahara and then up to Tongue or Bettyhill. That said there are sections which are not to be missed. I must sit down one evening and work on an alternative route including a route from the top of the M6 so drivers coming up to do NC500 don't have to do the boring M74 and A9 to get to Inverness in the first place. I might run some ideas past you Brian

Cam
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AndrewCS
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Re: My new Gen 2 2020 Macan Turbo 2021/03/19 17:18:18 (permalink)
A timely reminder Brian
 
I`ll be forgetting the Cup 2`s and fitting the `bull bars` instead 

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Re: My new Gen 2 2020 Macan Turbo 2021/03/19 19:37:02 (permalink)
We did a tour of NC500 with R4 3 years ago in last week in May, and other than one day of drizzle had brilliant weather, we had 6 nights in hotels en route from Inverness travelling as Brian has suggested in an anti-clockwise direction. It was fabulous, but if I did the route again, I would take longer, as I feel we passed so much worth seeing as we didn’t have the time to stop. The main obstacles we encountered were foreign registered motor homes travelling on roads that quite frankly they should not have been on, also lots of foreign bikers, but in general they are not an issue as they have the size & power on their side. Great trip I would thoroughly recommend it.
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Re: My new Gen 2 2020 Macan Turbo 2021/03/21 12:24:48 (permalink) ☄ Helpfulby AndrewCS 2021/03/21 14:46:55
Regarding the NC500 route north from Inverness, I agree the A9 north to Wick and John o' Groats can be a bit boring. That's one of my reasons for doing the route anti-clockwise. It gets the boring bit over with at the beginning, leaving the best until last. As an alternative, the B9176 Alness to Bonar Bridge heading towards Lairg is a good driver's route with a superb viewing point at the top of Struie Hill. Those not bothered about visiting John o' Groats can enjoy driving the A836 Altnahrra to Tongue road on the way to the north coast. Just remember that by cutting out Thurso, you will miss the chance of topping up with fuel. Thurso is the last opportunity to fill up with super unleaded until Ullapool on the west coast. (The unleaded pump at the Ullapool Gleaner filling station is at the furthest lane from the road. It's a tight squeeze for Macan owners).  
 
For those interested in POI's, I can recommend the following locations starting from John o' Groats and travelling west then south.
Duncansby Head and Duncansby Stacks.
Castle of Mey and Gardens.
Dunnet Head Lighthouse.
Sangobeg Bay.(Beautiful Beach with interesting geological features)
Smoo Cave.
Kylesku Bridge.
The Drumbeg - Lochinver B869. (Very challenging with many blind bends and steep crests).
Knockan Crag Cliff on the A835 to Ullapool.
Inverewe Gardens, Poolewe.
WW2 Arctic Convoy Base at Cove on the B8057.
 
There is a wealth of natural history and spectacular scenery on the NC500. You don't have to do the whole 500+ miles on one trip. You can cherry-pick the sections which are of most interest to you.
 
Brian
 
PS. I should mention another POI to those interested in taking the Lairg route. The Falls of Shin Visitor Centre on the B864 approximately 4 miles south of Lairg is well worth a stop. Decent food, toilets, car parking, and a path to the falls below. If you are lucky, you may see salmon leaping the falls in September/October.  
 
 
 
 
 
      
post edited by Brian_Innes - 2021/03/21 13:06:41

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Brian_Innes
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Re: My new Gen 2 2020 Macan Turbo 2021/03/24 11:15:38 (permalink)
Whilst on the topic of touring.
 
This week I saw two European registered cars in my locality, a Fiat 500 Italy registered, and a Volvo SUV Netherlands registered. Continental car tourists are common in the Highlands, and many have latched on the benefits of touring early in the season, but I am surprised to see continental travellers in Scotland under the current covid restrictions. Weddings, funerals, essential work or medical procedures excepted. Hotels and B&B's are currently closed, which leads me to the conclusion that the tourists concerned have family in the area.  
 
Whatever the circumstances, they have the roads more or less to themselves. The weather has also been excellent in the north and east of Scotland.
 
I picked up a windscreen stone chip on my Macan. It's low down on the screen and out of my line of vision. Thankfully repairable. Autoglass coming on Monday to do the needful.  
 
Brian
 
       

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Re: My new Gen 2 2020 Macan Turbo 2021/03/24 20:29:14 (permalink) ☄ Helpfulby AndrewCS 2021/03/24 21:33:52
so here is my suggested route from the pretty little town of Moffat just off the M74 up to Inverness and from there up Bonar Bridge
https://goo.gl/maps/1efKuC21i4vXvSr86
From there you can go up to Tongue (or Bettyhill) and pick up the NC500 and follow it anticlockwise.
a return route that avoids going back to Inverness is this route which more or less follows the NC500 
https://goo.gl/maps/vw6jVQivGj4wUi2C6
 then
https://goo.gl/maps/M4Rg4akoGiPNx6q18
so that you can come down the west side of Scotland and pick up the M74/M6
 
about 900 miles round trip from Moffat and all the roads are pretty good or brilliant
post edited by CamGTS - 2021/03/24 21:16:09

Cam
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Brian_Innes
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Re: My new Gen 2 2020 Macan Turbo 2021/03/29 11:31:21 (permalink)
Windscreen Stone Chip Repair
 
Autoglass successfully repaired the stone chip damage on my Macan windscreen today. The repair process took less than one hour, and I am pleased to report that it was entirely successful. This particular stone chip involved three applications of the resin solution and vacuum pump to ensure complete absorption into every part of the stone chip to effectively repair the damage. If you know where to look you can see a small opaque circle on the glass where the repair was applied, but I must say I am impressed with the finished result. Autoglass provided a very efficient and effective service for this particular stone chip repair.
 
For the interest of others less fortunate who may require a replacement windscreen on their Macan, Autoglass need the car to be presented at their workshop depot, and a replacement windscreen on the Macan takes up to 3 hours to complete. Both Porsche OE and aftermarket windscreens are fitted by Autoglass. The non-Porsche windscreens are held in stock in the UK, made by Pilkington to manufactures spec, and with a full diagnostics check on electronic functions after fitting.
 
The technician advised that should I be unfortunate enough to suffer another stone chip within 10cm of the repair, then a replacement windscreen would be required. Hopefully stone chip misfortune will not strike me twice in the same area.
 
Two photos below for your interest.
 
Brian
 
 
 
     
 
         
 
 

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Re: My new Gen 2 2020 Macan Turbo 2021/03/29 11:34:44 (permalink)
From the outside the stone chip repair is almost invisible. The tiny opaque circle following the repair can still be seen from inside the car. Fortunately due to its location, my PCGB windscreen sticker will obscure it.
 
A successful result.
 
Brian
 
 
 

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Re: My new Gen 2 2020 Macan Turbo 2021/04/07 15:03:33 (permalink)
Still in lockdown phase 2 here in Scotland, with leisure travel being restricted to the local area only. April 26th is currently the date deemed by Miss McTermite for the opening up of hospitality and the freedom to roam into other council areas.
 
According to recent reports from neighbours, Lochindorb, my favourite local spot for enjoying the tranquility of communing with nature, was absolutely mobbed with visitors on the Saturday of Easter weekend. All possible parking spaces were taken, and the paths to the hills and around the loch were crammed with people. There were even people on the island in the loch. Canoeists and wild water swimmers suspected as the likely insurgents.
 
For those of us looking for a peaceful foray into the Highland hills and lochs, this does not augur well for the forthcoming summer season. The hospitality industry are chomping at the bit to make up for lost revenue resulting from successive lockdowns. Bookings are already flooding in. More than ever this year timing will be all important. Early and late season will be best in my opinion, with the months of June, July, and August being in mayhem territory, especially on the popular tourist routes many of which have single track roads with passing places. I expect serious problems on those routes at peak times this year as many visitors will be new to driving in the Highlands. 
 
 
For my part, I shall head west and north to Wester Ross and Sutherland. It's easily doable on a day trip from my locality and I'll choose the time carefully. Another route on my radar is to the Cairngorm National Park in west Aberdeenshire. Travelling west on the A93 from Aberdeen to Braemar has many hidden gems along the way, as well as the more obvious venues such as Balmoral estate and the charming townships of Banchory, Aboyne, and Ballater. From the south, off the A90 north of Montrose, the B974 Cairn o' Mount from Fettercairn to Strachan (pronounced Strawn), leading to falls at the Bridge of Feugh. The B976 to Finzean (pronounced Fingin) is a wonderfully scenic route with many picnic spots by the river Feugh at its westerly extremities. The B976 after Finzean following the river, although a dead-end single track road, is well worth an excursion to the isolated local church at the end of the road.
 
Incidentally, the B974 Cairn o' Mount - Glen Dye route used to be included as part of the RAC International Rally in the 1960's. My dad and I used to go and watch the rally cars powering up the steep climb after splashing through the Glen Dye ford. I can still recall the shrill, high-revving two-stroke Saab 93 of Erik Carllson, and the gruff burble of Pat Moss's Austin-Healey 3000. Magic days.
 
Meantime, the Macan is resting awaiting its freedom on April 26th.
 
Brian          
 
                     
          
 
           
 
             

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Brian_Innes
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Re: My new Gen 2 2020 Macan Turbo 2021/04/09 15:07:34 (permalink)
After an 8 months delay, the Driver's Handbook wallet with the Owner's manual, Guarantee and Service booklets, arrived in the post today. According to OPC Chester, a combination of circumstances attributed to the extended Covid lockdowns and Brexit were to blame. Good to have these vital documents to hand at last. Come resale time they are absolutely essential being in the same category as two sets of keys.
 
My Macan Turbo continues to perform faultlessly. It's truly a turn-key car, supremely comfortable, practical, and with ample performance on tap. I can honestly say the car is particularly suited to the Scottish Highlands environment. The abundance of steep hills and winding roads that follow the contours of the land is where the extra power and torque of the Turbo model is much appreciated for the keen driver.   
 
During my 8 months and 5000 miles plus of ownership I have often reflected on whether the Turbo model is worth the extra outlay over the less powerful GTS and S models. For what it's worth I would say this. If your Macan is used for the urban school run and supermarket/garden centre trips then the extra power is wasted. On the other hand, if you happen to be a horsey family or caravan tourist then the extra oomph will come in handy when towing and encountering hilly terrain when out and about.
 
For the keen former motorsport driver like myself, the Turbo model is a perfect fit. Had I gone for the GTS model as was my original plan, I would be by now craving for the extra brake horse power and torque the Turbo brings to the party where occasions demand it. I love selecting Sport Chrono Sport mode with the sharper throttle response, rapid gear shifts and auto throttle blipping on down changes. When touring in convoy on dual carriageways and motorways, the Turbo has little performance advantage over the less powerful models. National speed limits see to that.
 
I accept that my driving needs and local environment are an untypical case for the vast majority of owners. If I were pressed to recommend a Macan model for the majority of owners, I would say the S is perfectly sufficient for most people, with the GTS being the icing on the cake for those of a more sporting disposition.
 
Regarding running costs, I have been pleasantly surprised with the mpg economy of the Turbo given its 2.9 twin-turbo V6 configuration. I would argue the Turbo model is no more thirsty than the GTS when pressing on, and on occasion will even return 30mpg on touring trips. Selecting Sport mode on the Turbo will incur a penalty of around 4mpg - 5mpg which I am pretty certain also applies to the GTS model. At least with the Turbo you have 440bhp and 550Nm to play with when the mood or terrain takes you. During my ownership I have never recorded less than 22mpg on a winding road trip, with 28mpg being the most common mpg achieved. The Porsche Connect app on my iPhone shows overall fuel consumption for 5350 miles as being 25.4mpg. This figure includes my Knockhill track test where 10.0mpg was the order of the day. As with my performance Cayman models, I didn't buy a Porsche for reasons of fuel economy. 
 
I am now counting the days until April 26th when the travel restrictions are due to be lifted in Scotland. I have a lot of catching up to do and some wonderful day trips to look forward to before the summer tourists arrive in droves. I prefer empty roads so I intend to make the most of it.
 
Brian  
 
                                            
 
 
 
    

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Re: My new Gen 2 2020 Macan Turbo 2021/04/17 16:16:26 (permalink)
With the lockdown inter-county travel restrictions in Scotland being lifted a week earlier than expected, and the recent glorious sunny weather, I decided to swap back to the 21" summer wheels and tyres on my Macan Turbo.
 
This time I did the swap in my driveway rather than inside the garage for reasons of the good weather and providing more space to work in. To gain the necessary lifting height for my 2 Tonne Halfords trolly jack, I utilised a larger section of kitchen worktop under the jack to allow for for and aft travel when raising and lowering the car. It worked a treat, and the wee jack did the job perfectly well. I tackled one corner at a time, chocking the opposite side wheels for safety. 
 
Due to the extremely heavy 21" wheels, particularly with the rear 295 section tyres, the trick is to raise the road wheel clear of the ground only by the minimum amount. This allows only a small amount of lifting effort required to locate the wheel on the hub flange. I have found it best to use only one 6" wheel locating stud positioned at around 4 0'clock on the hub to facilitate the alignment of the wheel when offering it to the hub flange. It's much easier to line up one stud compared to two. With the wheel removed, I cleaned the three hub flanges with a wire brush and smeared the faces with copper grease prior to refitting the road wheel. It's amazing the amount of rust that accumulates around the hub area, even within the short timescale of 5 winter months. I can easily imagine on some cars where the road wheels are infrequently removed that this accumulation of rust may cause the wheel to stick to the hub.
 
The wheel swap took just over an hour to complete. It also provided the opportunity to check the brake pad thickness on each brake calliper. I lightly smeared the wheel retaining bolts with copper grease before refitting sequentially in diagonal formation and hand tightening with the wheel wrench. The wheel bolts were then torqued to 160Nm after lowering the car to the ground.
 
Just to reiterate the PCM procedure when swapping wheels on the Macan with air suspension. With the ignition switched on, press the ride height button on the centre console for 10 seconds until the display shows self-levelling switched off. The car is now safe to lift with the jack. Following the wheel swap, press the same button again for 10 seconds until the display shows self-levelling switched on. The TPM settings for a change of wheel sizes and summer/winter tyres are reset using the right-hand steering wheel scroll to select TPM, then choose the appropriate wheel size on the display. After driving a short distance at more than 15mph the TPM readings will reset.
 
In conclusion, with the correct tools and an aptitude for mechanical skills, swapping road wheels is a straightforward job. I know many Macan owners will shun such tasks themselves. In my particular case I have a lifetime's experience at working on cars myself, and as long as my physical abilities permit, I shall continue to do so. It's a satisfying task to complete.
 
Brian
 
 
                                
 
  

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Re: My new Gen 2 2020 Macan Turbo 2021/04/17 16:19:46 (permalink)
This photo shows the clearance between the front tyre and the air suspension knuckle joint with the 21" road wheels. The tyre/suspension gap is far more generous than on my previous Caymans. 
 
Brian
 
 
 

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2019 718 Cayman GTS PDK
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Gen 2 Macan Turbo

Lancerlot
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Lancerlot PCGB Member
Re: My new Gen 2 2020 Macan Turbo 2021/04/17 19:10:05 (permalink)
Sorry Brian. Highjacked your thread again.
I've now moved my post to a separate thread.
Regards,
 
Clive
post edited by Lancerlot - 2021/04/18 11:04:45

The older I get - the faster I was!
Past - 924T, '911 SC, 911 C, 911 C2, 964, 996, 996TT, 997TT, 997GT2, 430 Scuderia, 997TT, 997TTS, 991.2TTS. Macan SD. Current - Macan .2 GTS, 992 TTS
Brian_Innes
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Brian_Innes PCGB Member
Re: My new Gen 2 2020 Macan Turbo 2021/04/19 20:02:42 (permalink)
Now that travel between counties is allowed, I took the opportunity to visit friends in west Aberdeenshire whom I have not seen since last summer. We sat outside and caught up with our news over a cup of tea in lovely warm sunshine.
 
The route taken was the cross-country A941 from Elgin to Dufftown then onwards via the Cabrach to Alford and the A944. The Cabrach route was thankfully free of traffic at this time of year. The twisting, undulating A941 winds its way through birch and pine plantations before opening out onto the Cabrach moorland. The road is narrow in places, with many blind bends so care is needed. I have by now acclimatised to the width of Macan and know exactly where the wheels are placed at each corner. An essential requirement when meeting other traffic, mostly agricultural, on such narrow roads with steep grass banks and rocky outcrops at either side.
 
This was my first drive of the year following swapping back to the 21" summer wheels and tyres. With the Macan being a heavy car, I can honestly report no difference at all in ride quality comfort between 20" and 21" wheels. The steering feels slightly sharper with the wider 21" alloys compared to the narrower 20" wheels, but only by a small degree. I would put most of the difference down to the excellent Michelin Latitude 3 summer tyres.
 
I used Sport mode in Auto Shift for this particular trip rather than my customary manual gear shifting just for a change. According to the PCM, the 152 mile round trip returned 25.7mpg. Pretty much the same mpg as I used to experience on the same route with my Caymans.
 
Brian
 
Photo 1
The A941 Cabrach route.
 

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Nairnshire,
Highlands
Previous:
2019 718 Cayman GTS PDK
Current:
Gen 2 Macan Turbo

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