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Helpful ReplyHot!My new Gen 2 2020 Macan Turbo

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Brian_Innes
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Re: My new Gen 2 2020 Macan Turbo 2021/06/15 13:06:33 (permalink)
Cigarette Lighter socket malfunction - mystery solved.
 
Following up on the comments received from Clive and Cliff regarding my fused central console power socket, I first of all checked the distance of the Nextbase contacts were within tolerance as described in the handbook. Checked ok.
 
I had already looked inside the cigarette lighter power socket barrel earlier, but decided to have another more careful look. Bingo! Neatly concealed at the bottom of the socket barrel was the spacer ring from the Nextbase power socket. It had become detached when the socket end cap unscrewed itself a couple of weeks ago. I had fished out the bits and pieces from the cigarette socket barrel, but missed the spacer ring which somehow had lodged at the bottom of the barrel.
 
After some very careful and delicate fishing that would do a brain surgeon proud, I managed to remove the offending spacer ring and reassemble the Nextbase power socket correctly.
 
Fortunately I had another spare fuse, which when replaced into the appropriate slot in the fuse box, my dash cam was back in action again.
 
This is yet another example of the benefits of sharing experiences, questions, and possible solutions on this forum. This avoided me the personal humiliation, had I left the fault for the OPC to investigate.
 
My thanks again to Clive and Cliff.
 
Brian
 
 
                      
 
 
post edited by Brian_Innes - 2021/06/15 13:09:19

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Nairnshire,
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Brian_Innes
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Re: My new Gen 2 2020 Macan Turbo 2021/06/15 13:07:51 (permalink)
Nextbase power socket properly assembled. I'll remember about the spacer ring should the end cap become detached in future.
 
Brian
 

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BrianJ
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Re: My new Gen 2 2020 Macan Turbo 2021/06/15 14:28:04 (permalink)
CLIFFWILKINS
When looking in the handbook I am wondering if it's certain type of plugs causing the issue apparently you need a specific plug with slightly longer prongs take a look in your handbook to see what I mean.

I had this with a dual socket I plugged into my Boxster footwell socket. The casing was shorter than advised by Porsche and if I pushed the plug right in, the metal outer casing on the plug shorted out on the outer edge of the socket. A very poor design of plug. Most other devices with a similar length of plug have a plastic outer edge so shorting isn't a problem. Porsche's recommended dimensions for plugs seem specifically to avoid this problem but very few devices seem to have plugs that conform to them. I was alerted by a flash when plugging in the device (fuse didn't blow) so I junked it and bought an alternative.  

Brian J
First 2003 986 2.7 facelift (80k in that).
Then 2009 987 Gen II Cayman S (47k in that).
Now 2013 981 Boxster S (35k so far)
Derbyshire Peak District
Brian_Innes
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Re: My new Gen 2 2020 Macan Turbo 2021/06/17 20:10:16 (permalink)
With the summer solstice approaching the daylight hours are long here in the north of Scotland. Sunset is already approaching 10.30pm in the evening, with sunrise at 04.20am.
 
The main tourist routes in the Highlands are now becoming very busy especially this year, with many visitors coming to the north of Scotland for the first time. The NC500 continues to attract huge interest, as does the Isle of Skye. Unfortunately the proliferation of camper vans, and their more bulky brethren large motorhomes, are increasingly causing major problems on the narrow single track routes where passing places were designated in the days of the perpendicular Ford Popular and Morris Minor. Large motorhome vehicles are entirely unsuited to the road infrastructure in the far north. For example, the Applecross peninsula is particularly unsuited to large motorhomes. The very steep gradients and tight hairpin bends on the famous Bealach-na Ba (Pass of the Cattle) has seen many camper vans come a cropper and get stuck with no room to manoeuvre, resulting in long tailbacks and frayed tempers. Some local communities on the NC500 route have even resorted to digging deep ditches at the perimeter of some of the parking lots to prevent these large vehicles encroaching onto the surrounding heather and peat moorlands and causing environmental damage. Wild camping is also on the increase with all the associated environmental damage caused by the more irresponsible campers.
 
The development of enlarged parking lots and the provision of public conveniences at popular beauty spots are currently on-going but it's a slow and gradual process. Back in the days of EU membership, Brussels funded many of the infrastructure improvements in the Highlands, but that is now history. You can still see the EU logo signage on some routes where road improvements were funded either wholly by the EU or in partnership with the Scottish Government.
 
My touring plans will continue to seek out the lesser known places that are off the radar for the majority of tourists. I tend to avoid weekends, concentrating instead on mid-week days for my excursions. My big advantage is that I live locally and can check the weather beforehand. I also have the flexibility of time to pick and mix my destinations. Most visiting tourists, excluding motorhomers and campers, have a time-limited and pre-booked itinerary which precludes ad hoc decisions for  spending time in places they discover that are attractive to them.
 
I'll be reporting on my various Highland excursions in the coming weeks and months, including how the Macan Turbo performs. The folding e-bike will also be properly tested as a travelling companion.
 
Brian
 
          
 
 
 
                         

Nairnshire,
Highlands
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2019 718 Cayman GTS PDK
Current:
Gen 2 Macan Turbo

Brian_Innes
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Re: My new Gen 2 2020 Macan Turbo 2021/06/24 11:39:47 (permalink)
Following on from my recent post on the vulnerability of the large outer radiator apertures on the Generation 2 Macan Turbo, I browsed the Zunsport website to enquire about the availability of an outer grille set. It transpired that outer grill sets are currently unavailable for the Generation 2 Macan Turbo. Generation 1 Macan Turbo models are catered for, as are the facelift (sic) Macan GTS. The 2020 model year Macan Turbo has a unique frontal design, incorporating headlight units, radiator apertures, and trim detailing, which subtly differs from the other models in the range.
 
I posted a message of enquiry on the Zunsport website regarding the omission of outer grille sets for the Gen 2 Macan Turbo, and received a prompt and very helpful reply from Peter Langston, Zunsport West Midlands, peter.langston@zunsport.co.uk . He confirmed that outer grille sets for the 2020 Macan Turbo were not yet available. Peter Langston went on to explain that Zunsport are always seeking development vehicles to expand their range of products. This requires the attendance of the "mule" vehicle on two seperate occasions at their premises in Cannock, West Midlands. 
1) To establish feasibility and produce working templates - 5 to 6 hours.
2) To establish fit and finish - 1 to 2 hours.
The grille set would be supplied free of charge together with a generous allowance for travelling expenses.
 
To say I was impressed with this most generous offer would be a gross understatement. Unfortunately living as I do in the Scottish Highlands near Inverness, the logistical challenges for me travelling to the West Midlands presented too many impractical barriers for me to accept this very tempting offer. It is with much regret that I had to decline.
 
I subsequently contacted Peter Langston offering my sincere thanks and explaining the practical difficulties relating to my particular geographical location. In his reply, I received permission to forward the foregoing information to PCGB forum members owning a Gen 2 Macan Turbo and residing in the West Midlands area, who may be interested in undertaking a development exercise for the production of Zunsport grille sets for this model. I for one, would be a prospective customer.
 
Brian
 
 
 
 
 
                   
 
 
                  

Nairnshire,
Highlands
Previous:
2019 718 Cayman GTS PDK
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Gen 2 Macan Turbo

Brian_Innes
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Re: My new Gen 2 2020 Macan Turbo 2021/06/28 21:05:34 (permalink)
Timing is everything in these busy staycation times. Weekends are best avoided.
 
For my day trip this week I chose a Monday, conveniently sunny and warm, and headed westwards on the A831 to two scenic glens 16 miles west of Beauly. Glen Canninch and Glen Affric are both served by dead end roads which discourages the less determined tourist. The roads are also single track and very narrow in places. The Macan Turbo's wide track fills the tarmac edge to edge on more than one occasion.
 
My first stop was at the village of Cannich, where I parked the Macan and unpacked the folding e-bike. As the weather was glorious I decided to cycle the unclassified  Glen Cannich access road leading to the Mullardoch hydro-electiric dam 9 miles distant at the end of the single track road. This road is accessible to vehicles such as the Macan and although very narrow the road surface is generally good, with some sections recently being resurfaced. Care is needed when meeting other vehicles as the passing places are occasionally far apart. Also worth mentioning is the significant drop at the edge of the new tarmac where the adjacent soft verges would ground low slung vehicles possibly causing serious suspension damage. A photo will follow later.
 
No such problems for me on the folding e-bike. The electric pedalling assistance made short work of the steep climb at the start of the route, and after a few miles by the cascading river, serene lochs opened out into moorland where herds of deer roam free. Being on my bike, which is almost silent, I was fortunate to come across a small herd of about 6 deer including two magnificent 12 pointer stags. As I was wearing a hi-vis vest they spotted me instantly and trotted away up the hill. Although quite large beasts, they move so gracefully over the rough heather terrain. The stags particularly are magnificent creatures and very well camoflaged with the surrounding terrain. The deer culling season starts soon and these magnificent creatures will be stalked and hunted. There is a sign by the road warning hill walkers to be aware of the deer culling season from mid July to late October.
 
The scenery at Glen Cannich is absolutely majestic, and it's understandably a popular area for hill walkers. The hydro-electric staff attending the dam also use the road so there is always some traffic on it. On my 18 mile cycle trip I met about 6 vehicles altogether, with another dozen or thereabouts parked at the walker's car park near the dam. I was pleased I left the Macan at Cannich and took the e-bike on this route. You see more of the wildlife in their natural habitat on the bike.
 
Following my return to Cannich I headed west on the unclassified single track road to the Glen Affric river car park at the end of the public road, where a pay-and-display car park charges £2 per day. It's well worth the effort getting there as the scenery is stunningly good. Loch Affric is fed by the river Affric and there are woodland walks and picnic areas to enjoy. It wasn't busy when I arrived there around mid-day. I enjoyed my picnic on one of the benches and tables provided.
 
 
It takes quite a long time to travel the 12 miles from Cannich to the River Affric car park. The road is very narrow in places, and there is one particular metal bridge over the river where the Macan completely fills the width of the roadway across the bridge. I also met a bin lorry on the way, fortunately near a passing place but it was still a very tight squeeze. I also had to back-up a couple of times to a passing place when meeting on-coming traffic at a blind corner. The Macan's high vantage point, excellent visibility, and superb door mirrors which the nearside one drops down to give a better view when reversing, proved to be a very useful asset.
 
This was my first real longish distance test with the folding e-bike. I reverse the floor mat in the luggage compartment to the rubber side uppermost. I then lay a travelling rug on top before placing the folded bike in the car. I use the optional luggage retaining system incorporating a safety belt material strap which can be tensioned to keep the bike stable in the luggage compartment. Careful placed old towels keep any sharp edges protected. The Macan Turbo can generate g-forces of a magnitude which would dislodge any unsecured load. The self locking strap of the luggage retaining kit works extremely well in this regard.
 
A few photos to follow.
 
Brian
 
  
 
   
                                                               

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Brian_Innes
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Re: My new Gen 2 2020 Macan Turbo 2021/06/28 21:07:27 (permalink)
This shows the drop at the edge of the tarmac. Particular care needed especially near passing places if reversing.
 
Brian
 
 

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Brian_Innes
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Re: My new Gen 2 2020 Macan Turbo 2021/06/28 21:08:57 (permalink)
Warning sign for hill wakers and other visitors during the deer culling season.
 
Brian
 
 

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Brian_Innes
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Re: My new Gen 2 2020 Macan Turbo 2021/06/28 21:10:28 (permalink)
Glen Affric River car park. 
 
Brian
 

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Brian_Innes
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Re: My new Gen 2 2020 Macan Turbo 2021/06/28 21:12:01 (permalink)
The scenic River Affric walk.
 
Brian
 
 

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CamGTS
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Re: My new Gen 2 2020 Macan Turbo 2021/06/28 22:10:37 (permalink)
I wish we had roads here in Edinburgh that are in such pristine condition

Cam
1980 Talbot Sunbeam Lotus
1982 Triumph TR8 (TR7V8)
1991 Peugeot 205 GTi 1.9
2004 Renault Sport Clio 182
2011 Porsche 911 GTS
2016 Porsche Macan GTS
Brian_Innes
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Re: My new Gen 2 2020 Macan Turbo 2021/06/29 12:30:01 (permalink)
There are potholes in the highland roads too Cam, but perhaps not to the same degree as Edinburgh.
 
The Glen Cannich road  is privately owned and the hydro-electric company contribute to the upkeep. Every user is grateful for that.
 
Photo below shows my way of securing the folded e-bike in the Macan. I use the extendable and self-locking strap which fits neatly over the saddle. I place old towels either side of the bike to protect any sharp protuberances. This together with packing the safety helmet etc, keeps the load from moving about. It seems to work well.
 
Brian 
post edited by Brian_Innes - 2021/06/29 12:35:31

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Brian_Innes
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Re: My new Gen 2 2020 Macan Turbo 2021/06/29 12:31:23 (permalink)
A photo of Glen Cannich hydro-electric dam.
 
Brian
 
 

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Brian_Innes
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Re: My new Gen 2 2020 Macan Turbo 2021/06/29 12:34:22 (permalink)
The end of the road at the Mullardoch dam. From here on it is real wilderness country beloved of hill walkers (and a few e-bikers too). Still patches of snow visible on the north facing mountain slopes.
 
Brian
 
 
 

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Brian_Innes
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Re: My new Gen 2 2020 Macan Turbo 2021/07/07 15:44:49 (permalink)
Oil Consumption
 
My Macan Turbo has now covered more than 7500 miles over the past 11 months since hand-over last August. This is considerably less than my normal pre-lockdown annual mileages, which were previously in the 10,000 to 11,000 mile range. 
 
I have the habit of checking my coolant and oil levels once a month, and like to keep the oil level at the maximum mark. Whenever the oil level drops a segment on the green bar, even though the instrument panel graphic shows "oil level correct", I top up with Mobil 1 5W-30 ESP Formula engine oil as supplied by my OPC. Experience has shown that approximately 250-300ml of oil brings the oil level graphic up to the maximum green mark.
 
In total, over the 7500 miles driven, I have added exactly 1 litre of engine oil. I consider this oil consumption acceptable for the type of vehicle, considering the V6 twin-turbo configuration. The Porsche Connect app shows a Service Interval oil change due at 11,900 miles. This should tie-in well with my already booked interim oil change due in October.
 
Every now and then when road and traffic conditions are safe to do so, I give the car a full throttle standing start through the gears. I'm fortunate here in the Highlands where there are a number of traffic-free straight stretches of road with open visibility, no road junctions, residences, or speed cameras in the vicinity. Traffic densities on main trunk routes, especially this summer, relegate safe overtaking opportunities to the very occasional, if at all. Running in convoy on A and B roads usually well below the 60mph maximum speed, mean the engine is turning over at low revolutions for most of the journey. Also, when "Normal" mode is selected, not all of the engine oil pumps are activated at low revs and this can cause pooling and clogging of oil galleries. By contrast, when "Sport" mode is selected, all oil pumps and coolers are activated.
 
I have always held the view that a performance car needs an exercise work-out now and again to keep everything in trim. A good blow-out through the revs also purges the GPF emissions filter, which is another source of possible problems if not heated to the 200c temperature threshold essential for the burning off of emission pollutants. Many car owners are unaware of this as I understand it.
 
In conclusion, gentle light throttle running may do more harm than good to these complex emission controlled engines. It's all a question of balance. I use 'Sport" mode frequently, in concert with manual gear shifting. It keeps me involved with the car, and for me leads to more enjoyable driving. I well know these days are sadly drawing to a close, but I intend to enjoy my driving whilst I still can.
 
Brian 
 
 

Nairnshire,
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2019 718 Cayman GTS PDK
Current:
Gen 2 Macan Turbo

Brian_Innes
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Re: My new Gen 2 2020 Macan Turbo 2021/07/21 15:26:17 (permalink) ☄ Helpfulby Peter_Bull 2021/07/21 15:42:36
I had my first tour south of the border for two years last week. I had planned to visit my friends in north Yorkshire last year, but prior to the Covid-19 vaccine coming on stream it was best postponed.
 
On this occasion I took the A96\A90 route south from the Highlands as heavy rain was forecast for A9 route. An overnight stopover at South Queensferry proved an ideal choice as it provided the opportunity to enjoy a long overdue catchup with friends from the Forth valley joining me for dinner in the evening.
 
My chosen route to north Yorkshire was via the A68 and A69 joining the A1 at Newcastle. In days long gone past the A68 used to be a thrilling drive with its roller coaster crests and dips winding its way across the border moors. Like many other interesting roads the A68 is now festooned with speed cameras particularly on the Scotland side of the border. Frustratingly they are often sited three quarters way along a convenient straight for overtaking. Completely cynical in my opinion, having  more to do with revenue earning than road safety. After crossing the border into England the safety cameras thankfully disappeared.
 
This was the first opportunity to have a long distance drive in my Macan Turbo. I used Sport mode 100% of the time. I like the sharper throttle response and the gear choice in auto shift is more to my liking rather than the default upshifts into 7th gear. On the motorway sections the car is satisfyingly responsive in the intermediate gears making overtaking slower traffic a breeze. The journey from South Queensferry to the Northallerton area took around three and a half hours. The car is a supremely comfortable and relaxing touring machine to drive long distances. Not an unexpected conclusion.
 
On my return to Scotland I dropped in at the PCGB track day at Knockhill. Unusually for Knockhill the weather was glorious with wall to wall blue sky, warm sunshine, and most surprising of all, no wind. It was good to meet up with my former motorsport pals after a two year break. I had already packed my safety helmet and balaclava, and signed on as a passenger on the day paying the £10 PCGB fee. Following two thrilling lap sessions with Chris Whittle in his modified Cayman GT4, and Matt Collins in his very slidey 987 Cayman S, I headed back home to the Highlands still grinning.
 
Altogether I covered 750 miles at an average speed just short of 60mph with an average fuel consumption of 28.2 mpg. No engine oil was consumed on the trip.
 
Brian
      
 
 
 
 
 
       
               
post edited by Brian_Innes - 2021/07/21 16:59:42

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