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IMS and rear box replacement

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Tizzy
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Tizzy PCGB Member
2020/08/01 16:24:30 (permalink)

IMS and rear box replacement

So I had my IMS replaced last week with a new ceramic version. Apparently the original (pictured) was actually in good shape after 95k, and it certainly rotated smoothly, though was full of oil, so I guess only a matter of time... What I did find interesting was that the IMS bearing is actually Made in England by NSK, quite surprising in a German engine - at least I thought so.
 
My back boxes had been welded (Badly) in a previous ownership and were split and beginning to blow. So my specialist, Cavendish Porscha in Long Eaton, recommenced a new stainless system from Spyder Performance which has remote switchable valves. I am really impressed with the quality and fit of this system and thus far would certainly recommend it - not unduly expensive either. The sound with the valves Off is basically stock exhaust, shade throatier. With the valves On, OMG, you might as well be in a GT3 - no Carrera I’ve ever seen has sounded like this! To be fair it is quite loud, but simply turned on or off via a fob mounted remote. Anyway I’m not affiliated to either Cavendish or Spyder, but would recommend both to other forum members. 


Cheers Chris

Attached Image(s)


2001/2 996.2 C2 Cabrio.
Daily drivers: Range Rover SVR, 991 Targa 4S
In the past:
2003 986 Boxster S Gen 2
2004 996.2 Carrera 2
1989 944 2.7 LUX (Resto. Project)

2 Replies

Motorhead
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Motorhead PCGB Member
Re: IMS and rear box replacement 2020/08/01 17:53:00 (permalink)
Chris,
 
Good to hear that the IMS bearing replacement went well and that you're now sorted. Somehow I've never been able to understand the philosophy behind running a (supposedly) grease-filled sealed bearing in a sump containing engine oil. Why not just rely upon that for lubrication, although I'm sure Porsche had their reasons?
 
I have the feeling that the IMS arrangement was carried over from the air-cooled engines which had a true dry-sump lubrication system and which would have required a sealed bearing since the majority of the oil would have been scavenged, but in the water-cooled cars oil is present in the engine sump, although oil is scavenged from the cam boxes.
 
Interesting choice and recommendation for the cat-back from Spyder Performance. There are so many systems available these days that it's a bit of a minefield. Because requests for exhaust recommendations are cropping up regularly on this and the Cayman forum it would be a good idea to have a pinned post in which recommendations - or otherwise - could be posted for reference.
 
Jeff

987.2 Cayman S
North Beds (R10 & R24)
Richard_Hamilton
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Richard_Hamilton PCGB Member
Re: IMS and rear box replacement 2020/08/02 09:57:02 (permalink)
The fact that it had become 'unsealed' and that oil was getting in, is probably why it was in good shape (and would likely have stayed so).  Some folks even go to the extent of removing the seal to let oil in.  Bear in mind the bearing is below the level of oil in the sump.

Richard
2017 Cayman S & Audi RSQ3
Previous:
1989 3.2 Carrera Sport, 2012 Cayman 2.9 PDK, 2006 Cayman S, 2000 996 Turbo, 1998 996 C2, 1994 993 C2
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