Menu toggle

Electrics gone haywire

Author
RockyStocky
PCGB Member
  • Total Posts : 5
  • Joined: 2018/12/28 19:12:59
  • Status: offline
RockyStocky PCGB Member
2019/04/18 11:20:42 (permalink)

Electrics gone haywire

Some of you may have encountered this phenomenon, and it may have already been archived here and with other worthy testaments, apologies if this isn't news for you.
 
I was boxing up my 996 after replacing the a/c condensers and thought I'd take advantage and drill out the front wheel brake disc ventilation holes which were blocked with caked dust. Whilst doing so, a strange noise emanated from the rear of the car which drew my attention; the rear spoiler had risen up!?! I looked inside the car and also noticed that all the advisory panel lights were lit and the driver's window had fallen to half open. I removed the ignition key but the panel lights remained illuminated. Starting to panic I immediately removed one of the battery connections which extinguished the lights but didn't explain the cause and had me thinking that I'd done something wrong. After a sleepless night I googled the issue to find that others have had the same problem and that this is simply the result of a battery that may not be entirely flat but near exhaustion. A quick recharge and all's back to normal.
 
Also, trying to remove the front wheels was a nightmare, the wheel studs were so tight I split the box spanner supplied with the car. The only way I could move these studs was with a socket fitted with a metre long extension arm from a 996 friend to provide enough leverage to crack the studs open. These were last tightened by my OPC Dick Lovett in Cardiff presumably with a pneumatic device; obviously they do this because it's quick but it doesn't help someone who's stuck with a puncture and can't remove the wheel with the standard box spanner or socket wrench. It might be worth checking your wheels to see if you can budge the studs with what you carry in the car for this purpose, before you're stuck with a puncture out there somewhere. If they are stuck, take it back to your service agent and get them to 'unstick' them and then retighten them with a slightly reduced torque on their pneumatic device (or by hand) or, at least, 'unstick' them so that you can tighten them yourself with your box spanner or whatever you carry in the car. That way, you know you'll be able to remove a wheel in a genuine emergency. Of course, safety is paramount, you still need to ensure that these studs are tight enough not to unwind during use! If you have any doubts, take the car to your service agent.
 
Oh BTW, the spare tyre was flat too . . . worth checking.

6 Replies Related Threads

    thirteeneast
    PCGB Member
    • Total Posts : 1085
    • Joined: 2010/09/15 15:56:51
    • Status: offline
    thirteeneast PCGB Member
    Re: Electrics gone haywire 2019/04/20 21:41:22 (permalink)
    I'd be surprised if OPC torqued them over 110nm I've always found most pretty good.
    Even a local guy that powder coated my wheel last year to my surprise pulled out a torque wrench.
    RockyStocky
    PCGB Member
    • Total Posts : 5
    • Joined: 2018/12/28 19:12:59
    • Status: offline
    RockyStocky PCGB Member
    Re: Electrics gone haywire 2019/04/23 09:41:58 (permalink)
    thirteeneast . . .

    Will borrow a torque wrench off said friend and tighten to rated Nm and see if I can remove the studs without the aid of a long armed socket wrench, which I don’t want to cart around in the car.
    Motorhead
    PCGB Member
    • Total Posts : 4011
    • Joined: 2011/04/20 12:13:14
    • Status: offline
    Motorhead PCGB Member
    Re: Electrics gone haywire 2019/04/23 11:10:08 (permalink)
    Philip,
     
    I think you'll find that most Porsche Centres and Independents are pretty good when it comes to tightening the wheel bolts to the correct torque. Usually it's the tyre factors who are at fault with over-tightening, using a "one impact gun torque setting fits all" approach.
     
    If you can get hold of some Optimoly TA aluminium anti-seize paste it's worth applying a small amount to the bolt threads and under the bolt heads to ease future removal.
     
    The "tree lights" effect you mentioned is indeed a common fault with a low battery voltage.
     
    Jeff

    987.2 Cayman S
    North Beds (R10 & R24)
    BrianJ
    PCGB Member
    • Total Posts : 647
    • Joined: 2004/03/09 19:56:52
    • Status: online
    BrianJ PCGB Member
    Re: Electrics gone haywire 2019/04/23 14:51:03 (permalink)
    My 981 handbook says quite specifically "wheel bolts must not be greased". I seem to remember that the 987 and 986 before it said the same for bolt threads, but that Optimoly-TA could be used between the cup and the bolt head, not on the cup surface itself. You can also wipe Optimoly-TA on the spigots over which the wheel fits to aid wheel removal.  

    Brian J
    Was 2003 986 2.7 facelift (80k in that).
    Was 2009 987 Gen II Cayman S (47k in that).
    Now 2013 981 Boxster S (34k so far)
    Derbyshire Peak District
    thirteeneast
    PCGB Member
    • Total Posts : 1085
    • Joined: 2010/09/15 15:56:51
    • Status: offline
    thirteeneast PCGB Member
    Re: Electrics gone haywire 2019/04/23 17:03:03 (permalink)
    RockyStocky
    thirteeneast . . .

    Will borrow a torque wrench off said friend and tighten to rated Nm and see if I can remove the studs without the aid of a long armed socket wrench, which I don’t want to cart around in the car.




     
    110nm isn't even that tight, you'd probably just about do it with your teeth let alone a wheel brace.
     
    What I've seen some monkeys do however is use an air rachet wound up far too high then put a torque wrench on and see if it clicks.
     
    Of course all this actually performs is a click counter IQ test for zoo animals.
    If there's any of these specimens working in Opc's they should be put down by the vet immediately.
    Terrifying stuff.
    Motorhead
    PCGB Member
    • Total Posts : 4011
    • Joined: 2011/04/20 12:13:14
    • Status: offline
    Motorhead PCGB Member
    Re: Electrics gone haywire 2019/04/23 22:42:15 (permalink)
    BrianJ
     
    My 981 handbook says quite specifically "wheel bolts must not be greased". I seem to remember that the 987 and 986 before it said the same for bolt threads, but that Optimoly-TA could be used between the cup and the bolt head, not on the cup surface itself. You can also wipe Optimoly-TA on the spigots over which the wheel fits to aid wheel removal.  




    Brian,
     
    FYI my 987.2 Cayman Driver’s Manual says to apply a thin coat of Optimoly TA to the thread and between the bolt head and moveable spherical cap ring.
     
    My Cayman’s a 2009 model and I’m aware that the wheel bolt torque was increased at some stage during 987.2 manufacture. Maybe that’s when the recommendation not to grease the thread was introduced and then carried over to the 981 series?
     
    Jeff
     
     

    987.2 Cayman S
    North Beds (R10 & R24)
    Jump to:

    Posts made and opinions expressed are those of the individual forum members

    Use of the Forum is subject to the Terms and Conditions

    Disclaimer

    The opinions expressed on this site are not necessarily those of the Club, who shall have no liability in respect of them or the accuracy of the content. The Club assumes no responsibility for any effects arising from errors or omissions.

    Porsche Club Great Britain gives no warranties, guarantees or assurances and makes no representations or recommendations regarding any goods or services advertised on this site. It is the responsibility of visitors to satisfy themselves that goods and/or services supplied by any advertiser are bona fide and in no instance can the Porsche Club Great Britain be held responsible.

    When responding to advertisements please ensure that you satisfy yourself of any applicable call charges on numbers not prefixed by usual "landline" STD Codes. Information can be obtained from the operator or the white pages. Before giving out ANY information regarding cars, or any other items for sale, please satisfy yourself that any potential purchaser is bona fide.

    Directors of the Board of Porsche Club GB, Club Office Staff, Register Secretaries and Regional Organisers are often requested by Club members to provide information on matters connected with their cars and other matters referred to in the Club Rules. Such information, advice and assistance provided by such persons is given in good faith and is based on the personal experience and knowledge of the individual concerned.

    Neither Porsche Club GB, nor any of the aforementioned, shall be under any liability in respect of any such information, advice or assistance given to members. Members are advised to consult qualified specialists for information, advice and assistance on matters connected with their cars at all times.

    © 2019 APG vNext Commercial Version 4.6