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Helpful ReplyHot!My 2019 718 Cayman GTS PDK

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Gazoak
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Re: My 2019 718 Cayman GTS PDK 2019/03/15 15:33:09 (permalink)
That's a great repair job Brian and I think if you ever move the car on, I doubt a buyer or OPC would pick up on it...unless they follow this forum. Well done. 
Blink982
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Re: My 2019 718 Cayman GTS PDK 2019/03/15 16:24:50 (permalink)
Cracking repair you have done there. I have exactly the same wheels and always abandon park my car away from kerbs. When my 718 was at the OPC for warranty work I was given a Boxster with carrera sport wheels identical to mine and both passenger side wheels were a mess of chips, gouges and scratches which I remarked at the time were down to the poorly fitting P-Zeros and their lack of rim protection.
COD981
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Re: My 2019 718 Cayman GTS PDK 2019/03/15 16:33:35 (permalink)
I share your pain Brian but you've achieved a brilliant result with the repair, it would have been easy to make it look worse/more noticeable but that's a great job and I am sure the tip will be of use to many, I didn't know porsche sold a clear lacquer so that could be useful too. 
 
glen_uk
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Re: My 2019 718 Cayman GTS PDK 2019/03/15 18:00:06 (permalink)
I thought I'd add to this post given all the talk about Zunsport grills. I went down to Zunsport today as they are using my car to produce a centre grill for the 718 BGTS with adaptive cruise.
 
They were shocked how many hits all of the radiators have had, one of the radiators in particular looks like it has had  around 50 hits with a couple of quite big nasty ones! I have some pics below, pretty bad in 3 months and 4000 miles!!!
 
They made the centre grill while I was there and we took it out for a test drive, no issues at all. Adaptive cruise worked fine. Had a good chat with everyone there and it will be a couple of weeks before they have properly completed and finished the grills. They need cover it in plastic and finish it off and I'll add some more photos.
 
Looking forward to seeing the finished article :)
 
Really great family run business and really nice people, they said quite a few people are waiting on these being available to buy so I hope some people on here see this who may be waiting. It was an email from PCGB that I replied to that allowed me to help with this so thanks to PCGB as well :)
 
cheers
 
glen
 
http://i61.photobucket.com/albums/h72/glen_uk/IMG_08501_zpsnxwv5kxi.jpg
http://i61.photobucket.com/albums/h72/glen_uk/IMG_08551_zpstqv9ximo.jpg
http://i61.photobucket.com/albums/h72/glen_uk/IMG_08521_zps5drinqep.jpg
http://i61.photobucket.com/albums/h72/glen_uk/IMG_08541%20-%20Copy_zpshoglziou.jpg
http://i61.photobucket.com/albums/h72/glen_uk/IMG_08511_zpsbswhbkl4.jpg
http://i61.photobucket.com/albums/h72/glen_uk/IMG_08491_zpswgvuzuwg.jpg
http://i61.photobucket.com/albums/h72/glen_uk/IMG_08531_zpsrjumvfo1.jpg
 
 
 
BJ Innes
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Re: My 2019 718 Cayman GTS PDK 2019/03/16 14:51:55 (permalink)
Motorhead
 
Brian,
 
Good to hear about your exploits 'down South' but very disappointed for you that everything didn't turn out as hoped, especially since you must have incurred significant expense.
 
Not the greatest weather for driving a low-slung vehicle amongst heavy M-way traffic. I would agree with your frustration about passing goods vehicles in heavy rain, but with so many hidden speed cameras on and near gantries drivers are becoming much more cautious about exceeding the speed limit even by a small margin. Not that I'm in favour of regulation, but average speed cameras are a much more sensible alternative and appear to be gaining popularity on main and trunk roads but don't seem to be common on M-ways for some reason - other than in road works..!
 
French roads have a variable speed limit that depends on weather conditions, but without smart signage it leads to too much confusion in my opinion. And you have to ask: realistically, how is it enforced?
 
It's a fact of life that with more and more traffic on our already heavily congested roads regulation will increase and, sadly, make driving for pleasure a rarer experience for most of us. Your Highland location must be one of the last bastions of care-free motoring - make the most of it while you can..!
 
Jeff




Jeff,
 
Your comments are very much in line with my own views.
 
Regarding your final paragraph on the subject of the Highlands being the "last bastion" of care-free motoring, I already see changes taking place here. The huge popularity of the North Coast 500, together with other actively promoted touring routes in Scotland, has resulted in significant increases in traffic densities particularly during the summer holiday season, which now peaks between June through to September. Many, if not all of the roads in the far north of Scotland are simply not designed for high volume traffic. Apart from a few routes across the north Highlands which have been radically upgraded with EU money, most tourist routes are single track roads with passing places. Unfortunately for the local population in those affected areas, the influx of large numbers of camper vans, caravans, etc, during the peak tourist season can cause major disruption at certain times of the year.
 
On the topic of speed cameras, it is becoming the default solution of Scotland's local authorities to install average speed cameras, "yellow vultures" as they are sometimes known. These are currently on major trunk routes such as the A9 and A90 Perth - Inverness, and Perth - Aberdeen routes respectively. The A9 Perth to Inverness for example has both single and dual carriageway sections, comprising 60mph and 70mph national speed limits. On a trial basis on the A9, HGV's currently have a 50 mph speed limit on single carriageway sections rather than the normal 40mph. What happens is, some car drivers sit behind an HGV at 50 mph, even though the speed limit is an average of 60 mph. This causes a convoy of slow moving traffic fearful of being caught by the "vultures" for exceeding the speed limit when overtaking. Some drivers just do not get the intelligent management of average speed traffic enforcement. 
 
For my own driving enjoyment, I endeavour to do my most of my Highland touring off-season. That is, during February, March, and October, November. Only then can the scenic roads be described as "empty and traffic-free". National speed limits of 60 mph on rural routes still widely apply in the Highlands. Unlike in Wales, and parts of Derbyshire, blanket 50 mph rural road speed limits have not reached this part of Scotland yet. However, I fear the onset of lower rural road speed limits are not far off. Due to the afore mentioned huge seasonal increase in Highland traffic volumes, many road safety activists are lobbying for a reduction in current 60 mph speed limit. The writing is on the wall for sure.
 
I shall be covering the observance of speed limits in my forthcoming "Touring Scotland's Highlands" thread in the General Discussion section coming up soon. 
 
Brian          
                                   

Nairnshire,
Highlands
Previous:
2007 Cayman 987.1 2.7 Manual.
2010 Cayman S 987.2 Manual
2012 Cayman R Manual
2019 718 Cayman S PDK
Current:
2015 Abarth 595 Competizione 180bhp Manual
718 Cayman GTS PDK

Technetium
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Re: My 2019 718 Cayman GTS PDK 2019/03/17 11:10:41 (permalink)
BJ Innes
The Long and Winding Road - First Impressions
 
 
 
Steering, tyres and brakes.
 
I cannot overstate the importance of specifying the Power Steering Plus (PSP) option in conjunction with the 20mm lower Sports PASM. The resulting extra road feel this gives to the Electric Power Steering (EPS) when driving on fast twisty roads or on track days is a highly significant benefit for the keen driver. As yet, I have not made any adjustments to the wheel alignment geometry, this will be done next month after the suspension springs and control arm bushing has bedded-in. Even so, the enhanced steering feel of the new 718 GTS with PSP is uncannily good. It has come a long, long, way from the mainstream 981 models where the steering feel fell well short of expectations for the keen driver.               
         
                                                           
     




Just joined, so catching up with this excellent thread.
I am in the market for a new/nearly new Cayman S and currently researching options.
I was interested in your comment above, as I had assumed that the benefits of PSP would be (mostly) related to low speed manoeuvering in car parks and the like.
I had therefore concluded that it was something I could cheerfully live without, but there is obviously a bit more to it, especially as I will be including PASM.
 
BJ Innes
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Re: My 2019 718 Cayman GTS PDK 2019/03/17 16:51:09 (permalink)
Techniteum,
 
Thank you for your supportive comments on my scribblings.
 
The Power Steering Plus option has been installed on both my 718 Caymans. PSP is an often misunderstood option, with people thinking it only provides extra assistance whilst parking. Not so with the 718 Cayman incorporating the revised steering rack ratio, which is 10% quicker than on previous Caymans.
 
If you log onto the Porsche configurator and click on the Power Steering Plus information button, you will see the updated explanation on improved steering feel explained.
 
The 2019 model year further improved the ECU programme on the electric power steering function to include an enhanced degree of extra feel at the wheel rim at higher road speeds. An attribute which I can verify as a further improvement in steering feel compared to my 2016 model year 718 Cayman S.
 
Brian
 
    

Nairnshire,
Highlands
Previous:
2007 Cayman 987.1 2.7 Manual.
2010 Cayman S 987.2 Manual
2012 Cayman R Manual
2019 718 Cayman S PDK
Current:
2015 Abarth 595 Competizione 180bhp Manual
718 Cayman GTS PDK

glen_uk
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Re: My 2019 718 Cayman GTS PDK 2019/03/18 18:39:28 (permalink)
Worth reading this, it seems you can turn on PSP as an aftermarket option software code. 
 
https://www.suncoastparts.com/product/SKU991PSP.html
 
This thread has lots of people who love it and those that don't, loads more info about such an emotive subject! From the Macan forum -
 
https://www.macanforum.com/forum/wheels-tires-suspension/42138-power-steering-plus-removed-today-print.html
 
 
 
ralphmusic
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Re: My 2019 718 Cayman GTS PDK 2019/03/18 18:58:46 (permalink)
glen_uk
Worth reading this, it seems you can turn on PSP as an aftermarket option software code. 

 
I had my 981 upgraded to add PSP in 2015. It is only software after all.
 

Modified Reg - Asst RS
Cayman 3.8S 981 PDK
RSRTC
Devon
Andrew718
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Re: My 2019 718 Cayman GTS PDK 2019/03/18 19:15:05 (permalink)
I’m aware that PSP can retro-uploaded, is a PTV diff an electronic upgrade or a physical hardware difference?
glen_uk
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Re: My 2019 718 Cayman GTS PDK 2019/03/18 20:50:57 (permalink) ☄ Helpfulby Andrew718 2019/03/26 14:58:02
Motorhead
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Re: My 2019 718 Cayman GTS PDK 2019/03/18 22:22:59 (permalink) ☄ Helpfulby Andrew718 2019/03/26 14:57:56
Andrew,
 
PTV combines a physical diff lock with rear wheel braking. I’m not aware that it’s a retrofit option as it would require the fitting of a limited slip diff and a software upgrade.
 
The PH link is ancient - a Guard LSD is now available for 987 and 981-series cars.
 
Jeff

987.2 Cayman S
North Bedfordshire
PCGB R10 and R24
BJ Innes
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Re: My 2019 718 Cayman GTS PDK 2019/03/22 12:19:49 (permalink)
First Quarter Report - 718 Cayman GTS PDK
The Best Cayman Yet?
 
Three months in, an Oulton Park track day done, and approaching 3000 miles, I am now up fully up to speed with my new 2019 718 Cayman GTS PDK. As already stated in an earlier post, the GTS is an optimised S. It is not dramatically different from its lesser badged sibling, but it is definitely a faster, smoother, sweeter, Cayman which, in true Porsche fashion, has been tweaked and refined with subtle upgrades to further enhance the keen driver's enjoyment. My previous 2016 718 Cayman S PDK had all the go-faster chassis options available at the time and was in effect a GTS in spirit if not in name.
 
The same 2.5 litre turbo engine has been "breathed on" by the Porsche R&D team in an irritatingly modest fashion to produce 365 bhp at 6500 rpm, and with the PDK option, 430 nm of torque delivered in an impressive flat-line 2000 rpm to 5000 rpm power band. It is this latter hike in torque delivery that sets the GTS apart from lesser 718's. In Sport mode, using manual gear shifting, the power delivery is silky smooth and instantaneous. As a manual gearbox driver now converted to PDK, I prefer to use manual shifting when enjoying a spirited drive on the flowing Highland roads of my homeland. Driven as such I have never, ever, experienced turbo lag in any shape or form. The only time turbo lag is discernible is when driving in Normal mode with the gear selector in "D". Turbo lag then kicks-in whilst the PDK software sorts out appropriate gear for the throttle opening. Switch to Sport mode, and the gearbox software will attune the gear selection and duration of in-gear holding according to your driving style at the time. If you are pressing on, "D" in Sport will hold the intermediate gears all the way to the red line if road conditions and traffic allow. Used in manual shift, the GTS PDK will deliver instant power exactly like a manual gearbox would.
 
The engine sound in no way approaches the melodic flat-six normally aspirated unit. That said, the new GTS has an improved exhaust note compared to its predecessor. The Gasoline Particulate Filter (GPF), and revised exhaust system have brought a more pleasant sound to the party. In Sport mode the engine revs urgently and unhesitatingly to the 7500 rpm red line. The 2000 rpm to 5000 rpm torque band provides train-pulling torque over a rev range that is commonly used in everyday driving. No flat-spots, no sudden "on-the-cam" sensation, just pure instant grunt whenever you need it irrespective of the gear engaged at the time. Accessible power I call it.
 
On the roads that I predominately travel on, the GTS is a stunningly effective and involving device. The steering, via the sublime smaller diameter alcantara steering wheel is the best I have experienced in any Cayman. The combination of a quicker rack, smaller steering wheel, power steering plus, optimised wheel alignment, lighter ceramic composite brakes, and Michelin tyres, have resulted in a steering feel unmatched by any Cayman I have previously owned, including my superb Cayman R. Point to point, the 718 Cayman GTS in my preferred spec, is one of the most satisfying cross-country machines money can buy. Porsche GT cars may have the upper hand on the wide expanses of multi-lane motorways and fast open circuits such as Silverstone and Goodwood, but pitch the 718 Cayman GTS PDK against the same cars on tight twisty tracks such as Oulton Park or Knockhill, and with a decent pilot, it'll punch well above its weight. The same goes for cross-country drives on empty Highland roads. The smaller footprint of the GTS, together with the big torque mid-engine layout, will disgrace many a more powerful machine with the engine at either end. In this environment the GTS is king.
 
In my three months of ownership, the engine has consumed no oil, and has averaged 27.7 mpg. No mechanical faults have arisen so far, and my first experience of PCCB on a Cayman has been nothing other than positive. The ceramic brakes are absolutely superb, particularly on the sort of hilly routes I encounter in my locality.
 
I'll leave you with a photo taken earlier this week heading north on the A939 Corgarff to Grantown tourist route. The road was empty of traffic, a fact clearly evident in the photo. I was able to park, take the photo, and continue my journey without hindrance. It shall be a very different story come the peak tourist season, when this road becomes chock-a-block with camper vans, SUV's, 4x4's and motorbikes. Fortunately this route being in my own back yard, I can pick and choose when traffic is light.
 
Finally, in answer to my headline question, is the 718 Cayman GTS PDK the best Cayman yet? For my type of driving, a resounding YES!  
 
Brian                  
 
                                    
 
 
 
 
 

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Nairnshire,
Highlands
Previous:
2007 Cayman 987.1 2.7 Manual.
2010 Cayman S 987.2 Manual
2012 Cayman R Manual
2019 718 Cayman S PDK
Current:
2015 Abarth 595 Competizione 180bhp Manual
718 Cayman GTS PDK

Technetium
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Re: My 2019 718 Cayman GTS PDK 2019/03/22 13:31:35 (permalink)
Nice account Brian. You are very lucky to have a 'back yard' where you can exploit the potential of the GTS.
Not sure about that Michelin sticker on the back though...
 
Philip
Gazoak
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Re: My 2019 718 Cayman GTS PDK 2019/03/22 13:52:02 (permalink)
A great report Brian. Having seen the 992 last night, I think the C718GTS is the best looking car of the current Porsche range. 
Ray
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Re: My 2019 718 Cayman GTS PDK 2019/03/22 14:39:20 (permalink)
Technetium
Nice account Brian. You are very lucky to have a 'back yard' where you can exploit the potential of the GTS.
Not sure about that Michelin sticker on the back though...
 
Philip


Technetium
Nice account Brian. You are very lucky to have a 'back yard' where you can exploit the potential of the GTS.
Not sure about that Michelin sticker on the back though...
 
Philip






West Yorkshire
PHB1969
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Re: My 2019 718 Cayman GTS PDK 2019/03/22 17:27:41 (permalink)
The roads look wonderful up there with you. How well are they policed?  I’m in North Yorkshire where there appears to be an army of camera vans which whilst they serve a purpose, also make the driving experience one of continually looking out for the vans.....it’s so easy to just creep over the limit....
BJ Innes
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Re: My 2019 718 Cayman GTS PDK 2019/03/22 19:29:59 (permalink)
There are speed camera signs posted along the whole length of the Old Military Road route which includes the A939 section shown in the photo. Police Scotland use mobile camera vans, unmarked cars, motorcycles, and hand-held radar devices to snare offenders. All of these methods may be deployed at any time throughout the year.
 
Road safety campaigns by the police on popular tourist routes usually start around spring and easter time and extend throughout the tourist season. I'm always suspicious of unmarked cars parked at the roadside in lay-bys, particularly dark coloured Volvos, BMW's, and similar. Vehicles of these types often contain hidden speed monitoring devices.
 
In a car such as my GTS, I can have a lot of fun driving within the legal limits on roads like these just by enjoying the high levels of mechanical grip and handling precision that the car provides in such abundance to the keen driver. As is the case when track driving, safety is the main objective. Maintaining concentration and looking far ahead also helps.
 
I fear that in time, a blanket 50 mph rural road speed limit may eventually be enforced on the main rural tourist routes. The ever-growing volume of tourist traffic using these roads will surely make it only a matter of time before this happens. 
 
Brian              
 
 

Nairnshire,
Highlands
Previous:
2007 Cayman 987.1 2.7 Manual.
2010 Cayman S 987.2 Manual
2012 Cayman R Manual
2019 718 Cayman S PDK
Current:
2015 Abarth 595 Competizione 180bhp Manual
718 Cayman GTS PDK

BJ Innes
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Re: My 2019 718 Cayman GTS PDK 2019/03/27 17:49:01 (permalink)
Following on from my previous post above.
 
For those interested, I have just concluded a new post under the General Discussion Area entitled "Touring Scotland's Highlands - Tips from a local".
 
If the conversations I have had recently are anything to go by, it seems quite a number of Porsche owners are contemplating a tour of Scotland in 2019.
 
Has the Brexit factor had an influence I wonder?
 
Brian     

Nairnshire,
Highlands
Previous:
2007 Cayman 987.1 2.7 Manual.
2010 Cayman S 987.2 Manual
2012 Cayman R Manual
2019 718 Cayman S PDK
Current:
2015 Abarth 595 Competizione 180bhp Manual
718 Cayman GTS PDK

BJ Innes
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Re: My 2019 718 Cayman GTS PDK 2019/04/01 17:08:23 (permalink)
Now that the clocks have sprung forward, and daylight hours are lengthening especially for us living in the far north, I decided to take a day tour to Wester Ross. The weather forecast was excellent and ideal for making the most of the scenic feast which lay in store, and enjoy my GTS on the superb Porsche friendly roads of this part of Scotland.
 
At 3000 up miles my car is now bedding in very nicely indeed. The sort of roads I spend most of my time on are ideal for settling in the suspension and keeping the brakes in good trim. Speaking of which, I can categorically say that I have absolutely no reservations or regrets about forking out the extra ££££ for the PCCB option. The crispness of the pedal feel, and the reassuring bite of the composite ceramic discs become even more evident on roads such as I use on a regular basis. The lighter unsprung weight at each corner also helps the dampers and springs deal with the demanding topography undulations, and frequent steering wheel twirling, extremely effectively.
 
The route I chose was a circular one heading west from Inverness to Garve, Kinlochewe, Gairloch, Aultbea, Little Loch Broom, Garve, and returning to Inverness. All in all a distance of around 165 miles. Being Mother's Day, when most households were otherwise occupied with family commitments, my tour was pure joy on uncluttered roads. My average speed and MPG for the trip was 51 mph and 29 mpg, which gives you an idea of the driving pleasure that can be attained on roads like these when traffic is light. The compact footprint of the 718 GTS combined with world class chassis handling, provides the keen driver with plenty of satisfaction without exceeding the 60 mph speed limits....well, not by any significant amount. Honestly Officer!
 
Much has written by others about the 718's droning engine and turbo lag. In my experience, on the roads I drive, this is absolutely not the case. The smooth, linear power curve from 2000 - 5000 rpm in the intermediate gears could not be better suited to Highland roads. Not once did I experience any turbo lag whatsoever. Those who follow this thread will know that I use Sport mode and manual gear shifting on rural roads. This goes back to my lifetime of using manual gearboxes, where I enjoy the involvement of shifting cogs when I decide to, not when the ECU programme decides. I would never go back to a manual gearbox car now, even though I enjoy driving my manual Abarth. The evolution of the new PDK on modern Porsches is as good as it gets.
 
For those interested I shall be posting the route and POI details of my Wester Ross tour on my other thread in the General Discussion section. Meantime I'll leave you with a couple of photos taken yesterday on my tour.
 
Brian                                                 

Attached Image(s)


Nairnshire,
Highlands
Previous:
2007 Cayman 987.1 2.7 Manual.
2010 Cayman S 987.2 Manual
2012 Cayman R Manual
2019 718 Cayman S PDK
Current:
2015 Abarth 595 Competizione 180bhp Manual
718 Cayman GTS PDK

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